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CCP and The Future

Two years ago, the National Association of Realtors began the Clear Cooperation Policy, a directive that compels agents to submit their listings to the MLS within one business day after any public marketing.

It was an attempt to quell off-market sales, but Glenn says that it’s done the opposite.

Specifically, because the CCP allows brokerages to have ‘Office Exclusives’, he asserts that more companies are withholding their listings from the MLS and selling them in-house without any attempt to include outside agents or buyers.

Rob and Sam, two industry titans, conducted a livestream discussion to see what else can be done.

Rob has the likely solution – that any agent who wants to exclude their listing from the MLS will need to get a signed waiver from the MLS committee to do so.

Yes, it has come to that – agents can’t be trusted to play by the rules, and will need a permission slip from the principal to officially withhold a listing from the MLS.

But it gets worse – I left a bomb in the comment section here:

https://notorious-rob.com/2021/05/in-which-sam-debord-and-i-solve-the-clear-cooperation-dilemma/

Listing Agents Handling Multiple Offers

The frustration among buyers on how listing agents handle their multiple offers is continuing to mount.  Because there isn’t any guidance from the industry, listing agents just make it up as they go – and in most cases, they just pick their favorite without any thought of other solutions available.

Here are more ways I’ve seen sellers leave money on the table lately:

Listing agents selling homes during their Coming Soon period, denying any other buyers.

Counter buyers for their highest-and-best, but then accept one within minutes before other responses are received.

Only countering some of the offers.

Off-market deals, which are great for the winning buyer, but bad for seller and other buyers.

The worst part is that sellers don’t have a clue – they are just happy to sell for more than expected.

When I’ve suggested my method to agents, they have trouble grasping the concept – that’s how deep the current snatch-and-grab mentality is ingrained in agents to make a quick deal.

What’s the solution?  List your home with me!

Get Good Help!

It never occurs to agents to properly conduct a bidding war where the market decides the winner.

Instead, they choose the easy route and just collect offers, itemize them on a spreadsheet, and then point out a winner to the sellers. It is an ego-boosting choice that fares well around the brokerage’s water cooler, but is likely to leave loads of money on the table.

Agents who deny open bidding and just process one round of blind offers are clerks, not salesmen.

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/23/realestate/home-selling.html

By the time they got the last offer, Quinn and Daryn Shapurji had received 54 bids on their four-bedroom, single-family house in Fishers, Ind., in just three days. Ms. Shapurji said they felt totally overwhelmed — and a bit melancholy.

“We felt bad that we had to say no to so many people, because we got a lot of beautiful letters from buyers saying how much they loved our house and why they wanted to live in the area,” said Ms. Shapurji, 32, a closing coordinator for a home builder. “Some buyers had already struck out on five or six homes.”

Chris Dossman, the couple’s real estate agent, suggested they take a cash offer that was $25,000 above their home’s list price of $220,000. “It wasn’t the highest offer they received, but the cash buyer waived the appraisal, so we knew that we weren’t going to have an issue with the home closing from a financing perspective,” said Ms. Dossman, an agent with Century 21 Scheetz based in Indianapolis.

“Fifty-four offers is by far the highest number of offers that I’ve ever received for a listing,” added Ms. Dossman, who has been an agent for 15 years.

“We’re seeing an inventory crisis,” said Katie Wethman, a Washington, D.C.-based real estate agent at Keller Williams Realty. Indeed, total home supply at the end of March sat at only 1.07 million units, down 28.2 percent from a year ago, according to the National Association of Realtors. The association’s data also found that homes typically sold in a record-low time of just 18 days in March, down from a 29-day average in March 2020.

Still, sellers face a challenge: “Getting inundated with offers can be overwhelming, and it can make it harder for sellers to choose the best offer,” said Alicia Stoughton, a real estate agent and designer at Keller Williams Advisors in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Why? Because “the highest offer isn’t always the best offer,” Ms. Stoughton said.

Here are the factors sellers should consider, in addition to purchase price, when evaluating multiple offers.

“Cash is king,” according to Nancy Newquist-Nolan, a real estate agent at Coldwell Banker in Santa Barbara, Calif. “I often recommend sellers take a cash offer, even if it’s not the highest offer.”

Still, mortgage buyers aren’t completely out of the running, said Ms. Wethman. “If you’re confident in the buyer’s lender and their ability to get approved for a mortgage, there’s not a lot of risk taking an offer from a buyer who’s getting a loan,” she said. Her advice to sellers? “Do your due diligence on the lender who is providing the funds,” she recommends.

This is a step where sellers can lean on their listing agent, Ms. Newquist-Nolan said. “I call up the lender and ask how qualified the buyer is for their loan,” she said. Moreover, “some lenders are notorious for dragging their feet and missing key deadlines.”

The best approach that sellers can take when weighing offers, Mr. Lejeune said, is to compare them side-by-side.  His strategy: “I present offers to my clients in an Excel spreadsheet that specifics the offer price, loan amount, type of loan, contingencies, and other important metrics,” he said. “It’s basically a cheat sheet for sellers.”

Ms. Dossman is also a fan of presenting offers in a spreadsheet. As she puts it, “You want to have all the information in front of you when you’re making a decision.”

Many buyers attach personal letters with their offers to try to sway the sellers in their favor. But some real estate agents don’t even show sellers these letters when they present offers to avoid the possibility of unlawful bias against a buyer. But Ms. Dossman said she will share letters after vetting them to make sure there isn’t any information that could raise the potential for fair housing violations.

Read full article here:

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/23/realestate/home-selling.html

Over List, April (First Half)

The trend of paying over the list price continues!

NSDCC Detached-Home Sales, % Closed Over List Price

January: 38%

February: 43%

March: 53%

1/2April: 57%

Most sellers and agents are happy just to get 1% to 5% over list. There were only 18 of 173 (10%) that sold for a double-digit percentage over list. The big winners:

Most % Over List Price

List Price
Sales Price
Percentage Over List Price
$969,000
$1,210,000
25%
$1,399,000
$1,700,000
22%
$1,099,000
$1,316,000
20%
$1,425,000
$1,675,000
18%
$3,000,000
$3,500,000
17%
$1,499,000
$1,750,000
17%
$999,000
$1,160,000
16%

NSDCC Sales, April (First Half): 173

(the number of sales was 45% higher than same period in 2019)

Average List Price: $2,349,402

Average Sales Price: $2,352,561 (100%)

Median List Price: $1,700,000

Median Sales Price: $1,750,000 (103%)

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Over List By Price Range:

Under $1.0M: 12

$1.0M – $1.5M: 34

$1.5M – $2.0M: 36

$2.0M – $3.0M: 12

Over $3.0M: 5

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When The Frenzy Busted Loose

The real estate market was boisterous in last half of 2020, which made it easy to predict that once we got past the election and into the new year we’d probably see the Greatest Real Estate Frenzy Ever.

Let’s use February 22nd as the day the frenzy really kicked in.

It was the day that this home was listed for sale, after a troubled past:

2005: $679,000 Sold (vacant lot)

2007: $550,000 Sold (vacant lot)

2008: $2,000,000 borrowed from WaMu

2009: House built

2015: $2,137,500 WaMu/Chase FORECLOSED

2016: $1,930,000 Sold

2018: $2,875,000 listed for sale for the next 18 months

2019: $2,044,000 Borrowed in January

2019: $2,225,000 last list price before FORECLOSED

2019: $1,540,000 sold at trustee sale 12/27/2019

2021: $2,595,000 listed for sale

2021: $2,840,000 sold 4/6/2021

Timing is everything!

NSDCC Over List, March

The trend of paying over the list price is increasing.

NSDCC Detached-Home Sales, % Closed Over List Price

January: 38%

February: 43%

March: 53%

Most sellers and agents are happy just to get 1% to 5% over list which will cover some or all of the commission. There were 22 of 244 (9%) that went double-digit over list. The big winners:

Most % Over List Price

List Price
Sales Price
Percentage Over List Price
$1,299,000
$1,655,000
27%
$989,000
$1,200,000
21%
$749,000
$900,000
20%
$1,325,000
$1,580,000
19%
$1,900,000
$2,255,551
19%
$1,535,000
$1,800,000
17%
$2,800,000
$3,200,000
16%
$2,198,000
$2,510,000
14%
$2,695,000
$3,075,000
14%

NSDCC Sales, March: 244 

Average List Price: $2,285,792

Average Sales Price: $2,252,883 (99%)

Median List Price: $1,788,500

Median Sales Price: $1,810,000 (101%)

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Over List By Price Point:

Under $1.0M: 6

$1.0M – $1.5M: 44

$1.5M – $2.0M: 39

$2.0M – $3.0M: 32

Over $3.0M: 8

A real bell curve there!

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The most sales over list are happening right where you’d expect:

Most Sales Over List By Area:

SE Carlsbad, 92009: 32 of 41 sales were over list (78%).

Carmel Valley, 92130: 22 of 32 sales were over list (69%).

Encinitas, 92024: 24 of 41 sales were over list (59%).

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88 Offers, 76 Cash Offers

This is the other article that several people sent in – thank you!

Rob Dawg wondered if these cases of dozens of offers could be tempered by putting the right price on these from the beginning. The agent’s Zillow profile shows 30 sales in the last year – and 26 of those were seller sides which is great and it means she knows something about pricing.  But I think when you are pricing a home on the lower-end of the market these days, you can add easily 10% on top of the comps and buyers won’t notice – because other sellers are already doing it too. Note: the agent didn’t take the highest offer here either.

Ellen Coleman had never received so many offers on a house in her 15 years of selling real estate.

She listed a fixer-upper in suburban Washington, DC for $275,000 on a Thursday. By Sunday evening, she had 88 offers. “The offers just kept coming,” she said. “I felt like Lucy with the chocolates. I’m thinking, ‘This is just out of control.'”

Of those 88 offers, 76 were all-cash, said Coleman, who works for RE/MAX Realty Centre. There wasn’t even enough time for all of the bidders to visit the property. She said 15 offers were sight unseen.

The four-bedroom, 1,800 square-foot home sold for $460,000, nearly a 70% increase from the asking price. She said the winning bid was not the highest offer, but it was all-cash with no contingencies and it had paperwork in place.

The buyer, she said, is an investor who is likely to renovate and resell at an even higher price.

“It was a lower priced property for the area and may have been an outlier,” she said. But even her other listings have typically been getting closer to 15 offers. “Several people came in wanting to be homeowners and do the repairs themselves. There is such low inventory out there and people feel like that is a way they can get into a home.”

Read full article here:

https://www.cnn.com/2021/03/29/success/when-will-housing-market-cool-off-feseries/index.html

122 Offers

Thanks to the readers who sent in this article – and it makes you wonder how many offers any house for sale would get if listing agents didn’t shut down the showings so quickly:

CITRUS HEIGHTS, Calif. (KTXL) — A Citrus Heights home in a quiet cul-de-sac received 122 offers in one weekend on the market.

The 1,400 square feet home has three bedrooms, two baths and a spacious backyard with a swimming pool and an asking price of $399,900.00.

“People would think that it was underpriced. It was not underpriced. It was straight on with the comps,” said Deb Brittan, the listing agent for the property. “I had hoped, I thought, maybe if we get 20 offers that would be amazing.”

Barry and Anita Jackier are the sellers of the Citrus Heights home.

“We had this little friendly wager going. I’m like, ‘I think we’re going to get eight offers,” Anita Jackier said.

“I said 10,” Barry Jackier said.

They all underestimated the number of offers, by a lot.

They received 122 offers in one weekend.

“That’s 121 people who didn’t get a house. And that’s kind of heartbreaking in this market to think that there are so many buyers out there. And if you don’t have an agent that understands how to put a strategic offer in on a house and get it accepted, you’re just out burning your gas and a lot of emotional turmoil because of the nature of our market currently,” Brittan said.

Brittan says the highest offer was above $500,000, but that was not the winning offer. There were other factors to consider.

The couple is buying a home in Idaho.

They need time for the escrow to close on that home, so one big factor was they needed a buyer to wait until that happens before moving in.

“I’d like to think that the buyer that was supposed to have gotten the house, has gotten the house,” Brittan said.

The selling price of the home was in the mid-$400,000 range.

“We have so many great memories. And that’s going to be hard to let go of,” Barry Jackier said.

“But you know what I’m excited about is now another family gets to have a blank palate to make all those memories on. We are keeping those memories and they have an opportunity to start their own,” Anita Jackier said.

The couple said they felt called by God to move to Idaho and from that perspective, it’s a miracle they were able to find a home there.

“That house was on the market for three hours,” Anita Jackier told FOX40.

“So I don’t know that it’s going to slow down any time soon. And I don’t know what it’s going to take to slow it down,” Brittan said.

https://fox40.com/news/home-for-sale-in-citrus-heights-receives-122-offers-in-one-weekend/

Number of Offers

To provide some transparency on the deal-making on the street, here’s a review of properties that have gone pending this week.  I didn’t intend to make a blog post out of it, but I had inquired about the availability of these listings, and for my own knowledge I like to ask how many offers the listings agents have received.

 

They had FIVE OFFERS on 1833 Willowhaven, and another similar home that listed on the same side of the street for $1,299,000 also had multiple offers.  A good example of how a few more listings in the lower price ranges should all get picked up.

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They had SEVEN OFFERS on this one.  Any of the one-story homes listed under $1,000,000 should attract a crowd for the foreseeable future.

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They had SIX OFFERS on this one.  Newer Davidson homes are always going to be popular, and though the yard was brief, this has a pretty good view.

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They had TEN OFFERS on this one, and you can see why. Houses on a culdesac with a backyard this big will draw a crowd in any market.

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They had EIGHTEEN OFFERS on this one, because it checks most of the boxes. Well-priced single-level with nice private yard that’s been tastefully renovated.  The 17 other buyers will be battling it out for months on these!  I commend the listing agents for providing enough access to accommodate that many people and offers.

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