Prefab Office Shed

Hat tip just some guy for sending in this article on smaller but cheaper alternatives:

With modern looks and efficient construction, prefab continues to be an alluring option for building a new home. But if you already have a house, adding a backyard structure made from components produced off-site can be an easy and practical way to make the most of your property.

Compact prefab sheds often won’t require a permit to install and their potential uses can go way beyond simple storage or workshop space—think a home office, yoga studio, writing retreat, guest house, music room, and so on.

Below, we’ve rounded up five rad prefab shed lines that you can order from right now. The estimated price ranges do not include costs associated with any permits, shipping, foundation, and installation, unless otherwise noted.

https://www.curbed.com/21267449/prefab-homes-shed-for-sale-backyard-office-studio

Carlsbad Protests This Weekend


One guy pops off (below), and the next thing you know Carlsbad is trending on twitter and the National Guard is rolling our way. Hopefully everyone will keep their heads!

Jumbo 90% LTV

The coronavirus caused banks to pull back on lending, and one niche that was severely impacted was jumbo loans with less than 20% down payment.  In early March, you could have borrowed $2,500,000 with 10% down, and by the end of March the max was down to $850,000.

We got lucky and found Dustin at Mission Fed, who is still funding the jumbos at 90%LTV up to $1.5M!  My buyers thought he made the process simple and easy, and we closed escrow on the day Dustin predicted in the beginning.  We couldn’t be more pleased with the service.

Here is a quick snapshot of some of the out of the box programs and jumbo programs at Mission Fed. This assumes a score of 720+ on an owner occupied purchase of a single family home:

  • 0% down loans to $690,000 (*Not a VA loan. Anyone can qualify for this)
    • 7/1 ARM at 3.125% with a 1% lender credit back for closing costs
    • 10/1 ARM at 3.25% with a 1% lender credit back for closing costs
  • 30 yr Fixed Jumbos with only 5% down
    • 5% down up to a loan amount of $850,000 – Rate as low as 3.25%
    • All on one loan. No need for a high rate HELOC
  • 10% down payment up to loans of 1.5M
    • 7/1 ARM at 3.125% with a 1% lender credit back for closing costs
    • 10/1 ARM at 3.25% with a 1% lender credit back for closing costs
    • 5/5 ARM @ 2.625% with a 1% lender credit back for closing costs
    • 30 yr fixed jumbo at 3.25%

I like to help people, so I thought I’d mention him and his contact info for anyone reading who might be in the same fix.  I don’t know any other lender offering these programs at these low rates – if you know someone, pass them along.

Dustin Gildersleeve · Mortgage Loan Originator at Mission FCU

Real Estate · NMLS #13509

Phone: 619-379-0196 · Fax: 858-777-3612

dusting@missionfed.com

To apply – www.missionfed.com/dustin

Lower Supply = Higher Appreciation

From First American:

In April, pandemic-related pressure drove the supply of homes for sale to its lowest April supply level ever. Even in the years prior to the pandemic, the lack of housing supply for sale was a significant headwind to the housing market. A major reason for the lack of homes for sale is increasing tenure – the length of time a homeowner lives in their home. Since the Great Recession, tenure has rapidly increased from approximately seven years to currently more than 12 years, the highest it has ever been. Increasing tenure means existing homeowners, who supply the overwhelming majority of homes for sale, are not selling, which limits supply.

Prior to the pandemic, rising tenure length was the byproduct of two trends – older homeowners aging in place and many existing homeowners being locked-in with historically low mortgage rates. The pandemic-driven economic uncertainty and concerns about the potential health risks associated with showing homes to buyers have made existing homeowners more hesitant to list their homes for sale, exacerbating the increasing tenure issue.

You Can’t Buy What’s Not for Sale

The graph below shows inventory turnover, the total supply of homes for sale nationwide as a percentage of occupied residential inventory. A quick look will show that inventory hit a 25-year low point in December 2019, with a turnover rate of 1.52 percent. In other words, only 152 homes in every 10,000 were for sale, well below the historical average of about 2.5 percent, or 250 homes in every 10,000. Since then, housing supply had slowly and modestly improved. Enter the pandemic in April. Housing inventory fell once more to 1.58 percent. The chart also breaks down inventory by its components: existing-home and new home inventory for sale. Existing-home sales make up approximately 90 percent of all home sales, which means more existing homeowners must sell their homes in order for supply to increase significantly.

But existing homeowners are staying put. Historically high tenure length of over 12 years means both fewer buyers and fewer homes on the market, and a reduction in existing-home sales. In the months preceding the pandemic, there was some modest improvement in the situation as the pace of tenure length growth had slowed, falling to 7.6 percent year-over-year in February. Then came the pandemic and the annual growth rate of tenure length accelerated to 8.5 percent in March and remained that high in April. As more homeowners were reluctant to list their homes for sale amid the pandemic, the supply of homes available to potential home buyers dwindled further. You can’t buy what’s not for sale.

Existing homeowners are staying home everywhere. Average tenure length increased in April in each of the 50 large metropolitan areas we track relative to one year ago. While beginning to slow in most markets in February, annual tenure length appreciation picked up the pace in 45 of the 50 markets once the economic impacts of the pandemic hit in March and April 2020. As pent-up demand from the pandemic-delayed spring home-buying season enters the market, potential home buyers have very limited inventory to choose from. Lack of supply relative to demand is a sure-fire recipe for increasing house price appreciation.

Link to Article

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Our inventory has been very consistent in the past – there is only a 10% spread between the high and the low number of listings between 2014-2019. But now we have 20% fewer NSDCC listings than last year, and the median list price is 9% higher:

Number of NSDCC Listings Between January and May

Year
# of Listings
Median LP
2014
2,245
$1,285,000
2015
2,342
$1,299,000
2016
2,486
$1,425,000
2017
2,295
$1,445,000
2018
2,225
$1,499,998
2019
2,282
$1,550,000
2020
1,822
$1,684,448

There are additional variables in our market today that we’ve never experienced before, so maybe price will get less scrutiny? Will buyers just pay what it takes to get a house they like?

Paint Survey Goes Viral


Hat tip Susie!

PORTLAND, Ore. — The Landreths had just pulled the vinyl siding off their house and the cedar siding underneath was in dire need of a paint job. The boards were covered in peeling white paint and needed new life. But picking out the next paint color for your house can be a tough decision.

“We don’t want to be that neighbor with that bright ugly house that everyone sees every day,” Brian Landreth said.

So, they did what any 21st century Portland family would do: they crowdsourced it.

“We wanted to get the input of our neighbors,” Landreth said. “There’s a lot of pedestrians, bikes that go by daily.”

Landreth placed a sign out front with a QR code. The sign read, “Help us choose a color.” On the side of the house were five options.There’s Rocky Mountain, Wild Orchid, In Good Taste, Blessed Blue and finally, It’s Well. When a person scans the QR code they are directed to a Google Docs survey where they can rate the colors on a scale from 1-5.

The Landreths’ daughter Grace is taking a technology class in school and decided to use this survey as a way to collect data for a school assignment. Grace figured she would get a few hundred responses. What she wasn’t expecting was over 70,000.

“I didn’t think people from across the planet would vote on the color of my house that they probably don’t know where it is,” Grace said.

A neighbor tweeted a photo of the survey and it quickly took off. The Landreths started getting votes from around the world.

“Oh, this is cute. There’s someone from France, there’s someone from New York, this is fun,” Brian said when he first started getting votes.

Tens of thousands more poured in from as close as Portland to as far away as Brazil and Morocco and the opinions were as diverse as the country they were coming from.

“People from Portland are very opinionated on what we should see here in Portland. It’s so neat to see, you know, it seems like votes from the Midwest are like keep it brown, keep it neutral, keep it safe. People from Buenos Aires and Brazil are like bright and bold, do a mural!”

Home design network HGTV even retweeted the neighbor’s photo asking for votes.

The Landreths are surprised by all the responses, but say it’s perfect during this time.

“It’s been really fun. Neighbors have been so cool. It seems to really help with the sense of community. It’s like we’re all together, apart,” said Brian’s wife, Kim.

So, what are their favorites? Grace would choose options 4 and 5, Kim says 3, 4 or 5 and Brian said he could see himself going bold with number 2, Wild Orchid.

Voting will end sometime in June.

Link to Article

22 Offers

Not mentioned was the list price was $7,000,000 (on April 2nd), and the listing agent represented the buyer too:

Even in the throes of a pandemic, the offers started coming in almost immediately.

The day after an off-market opportunity in Beverly Hills was made known in late March, as Los Angeles County residents adjusted to new stay-at-home orders, the listing agent found his inbox flooded and his phone ringing off the hook. Seemingly everyone wanted a piece of the property, which was marketed by email. Within the first 24 hours, there were dozens of calls on the property and 18 offers made.

“I knew we’d see some action, I just didn’t know how much,” said Paul Salazar, the listing agent with Hilton & Hyland.

The home on North Bedford Drive, a popular street in the Flats section, received a total of 22 offers, according to Salazar. The potential buyers were a mix of end-users — buyers who wish to remodel and live in the home — and developers looking to tear down the existing structure and build. Ultimately, it was an end-user that purchased the property for $6.75 million.

The Italianate-style house, built in 1928, has four bedrooms, 3.5 bathrooms and more than 3,500 square feet. A large motor court sits off the front of the one-third-acre property.

Salazar believes marketing the home as an off-market opportunity gave it more exclusivity, but the excitement began to wear off as “everyone began watching the news” and reality of the coronavirus set in. Additionally, about one-third of the buyers, specifically those carrying mortgages, were ruled out over concerns that loans might be frozen due to the pandemic.

“It looked like it was going to be a big bidding war, but it ended up being a long negotiation with 3-4 buyers going back and forth,” Salazar said.  Had the pandemic never happened, Salazar believes the property would have sold for about $1 million more.

While the coronavirus has stifled sales throughout the Southland, L.A. County’s high-end market has continued to produce a steady stream of multimillion-dollar deals.

In April, there were eight sales of $10 million or more including two deals north of $36 million in nearby Bel-Air. Last month, there were five sales of $10 million or more including two transactions of $21.5 million or more.

Link to Article

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