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Best Days for Online Home Looking

home lokking days

Sundays are the favorite day to look at homes online.  From

So what is the true Black Friday of the housing business? Here’s a holiday shocker: Dec. 28 was actually one of the busiest days for real estate searches in the entire year, despite the fact that Dec. 24 was the single slowest.

The reason: When we’re over the holiday hump but still on break, it’s a great time to look for our dream home. The same reason explains the surge of activity on New Year’s Day. And, perhaps buying a house is a popular New Year’s resolution?

Another surprising, best-performing day on a holiday weekend: the other side of the year, July 6. Instead of traveling, many buyers apparently use the long weekend in the height of the buying season to search for homes and go to open houses.

Overall, the spring market typically has the best combination of inventory and value—more homes go onto the market, but prices have not yet thawed. If you miss out on that sweet spot, the second-best opportunity is in fall. Sept. 1, on Labor Day weekend, was another top performer—it’s all part of a seasonal pattern that buyers and sellers can use to their advantage if they are not constrained by school schedules or job transfers.

Besides family-oriented holidays, there’s one more holiday that significantly slows down home-searching activity. Nope, not Mother’s Day, not Father’s Day, but … Valentine’s Day. Think about it: Your significant other wants to take you out for a romantic dinner. Are you gonna say no because you want to stay at home to browse photos of fixer-uppers?

Posted by on Nov 30, 2015 in Jim's Take on the Market, Market Conditions, Thinking of Buying?, Thinking of Selling? | 0 comments

‘Drive Until You Qualify’


We know that we’re running out of land in San Diego County – here’s a story from the VOSD about Americans going to Tijuana for real estate development. 

An excerpt:

“What is really misunderstood is that Tijuana is very important to San Diego. It’s actually where our affordable housing is,” said Shannon.

That is, working-class residents have already realized they can escape San Diego’s high housing costs by crossing the border.

More than 36 million people came through the San Ysidro border crossing in 2014, according to data from the U.S. Customs and Border Patrol. And the San Ysidro trolley station is also the second-most active on San Diego’s network, with about 17,955 riders daily. Given that San Ysidro is home to only 20,000 people between 20 and 60 years old, it’s a safe assumption that many of those riders come from Tijuana.

It’s an international version of what real estate agents call “drive until you qualify.” Facing unaffordability, residents fan out ever farther, trading cheaper housing for longer commutes.

In a lot of housing markets, increases in housing prices force wage increases, but that hasn’t happened in San Diego, said Erik Bruvold, president of the National University System Institute for Policy Research.

That’s partly because people can instead live in Tijuana and Temecula and work in San Diego, he said.

“Sometimes the figures for housing and housing prices in San Diego County can be a bit misleading,” Bruvold said. “They don’t help us understand how housing prices in Temecula and Baja are and how they interact with the San Diego economy.”

Much of Murrieta and Temecula were built because housing costs in San Diego pushed lower-wage residents to the area, said Greg Strangman, a developer working on a hotel project in Tijuana.

“That’s how that Inland Empire came about,” Strangman said. “And in the same way, you could have the same situation in Tijuana. It’s a shorter commute coming from Tijuana to San Diego than Temecula to San Diego.”

Read full article here:

Posted by on Nov 30, 2015 in Builders, Jim's Take on the Market, Thinking of Building?, Thinking of Buying? | 1 comment

Inventory Watch


Thanksgiving week is traditionally one of the slowest weeks of the year for new listings to hit the market.  But demand is steady – there were more new pendings (42) than new listings (35), and one of my buyers got caught up in a bidding war that culminated on Thanksgiving Day!

Click on the link below for the complete NSDCC active-inventory data:

Read More

Posted by on Nov 30, 2015 in Inventory, Jim's Take on the Market | 0 comments

3D Tours


The new 3D tours are becoming more popular, and it won’t be long before we see these on most higher-end listings.  Here is a company that is using one of the new Matterport cameras:

We should get familiar with the format – because you can get a good sense of the home with just a few clicks and scrolls.  Here is a link to one of their projects, a penthouse at the Harbor Club:

Posted by on Nov 29, 2015 in Jim's Take on the Market, Listing Agent Practices, The Future | 0 comments

More Water, Not Enough Water Storage


Hat tip to daytrip for sending in this article from the – an excerpt:

The $1-billion desalination plant coming online next month in Carlsbad will fit right in with years of careful planning and investment in water supply in San Diego County.

It will also worsen a peculiar San Diego problem amid a multiyear drought: an oversupply of water.

Unlike other parts of California, San Diego has 99% of the water needed for normal usage. But statewide conservation mandates have applied equally to areas that have plenty of water and those that don’t, so the result here has been water piling up unused while local water agencies raise rates to make up for lost sales.

Carlsbad Mayor Matt Hall, a San Diego County Water Authority board member, said the situation is hard to explain to his constituents.

“It’s real hard to tell them, ‘You have to let your grass die,’ and in the same breath you have to tell them, ‘We have more water than we can use,'” he said.

Enter the desalination plant. The private venture kicked off a 30-day test period Nov. 9 and is expected to start producing water next month, enough to meet between 7% and 10% of the county’s demand. Water officials agreed in 2012 to buy the water whether they need it or not, to make the plant financially feasible.

The new supply is just one more reason local water officials are advocating for the state to ease conservation mandates for areas where supplies are ample, which would lessen the oversupply.

The desalinated water will be more expensive than the county’s current supplies, triggering $5 a month in increased water rates for most households. As the more expensive water arrives, it will have implications for the water authority, which recently has had to cut back on purchases of imported water it’s entitled to on a temporary basis.

Next year, the desalinated ocean water will cost San Diego water agencies at least $113.6 million — more than double the $45.2 million they would pay for the same amount of imported water, which remains available despite a statewide drought.

Even before that water comes online, San Diego has been running up against storage limits.

Read full article here:

Posted by on Nov 29, 2015 in Jim's Take on the Market, Local Flavor, Local Government | 1 comment

‘New Normal’


Hat tip to CB Mark for sending this in from the – an excerpt:

This year, Chinese families represented for the first time the largest group of overseas home buyers in the United States. Big spenders on new homes are helping prop up local economies in the Midwest. But in dense areas like San Francisco and Manhattan, they are also affecting the affordability and availability of housing, as demand outpaces supply and bidding wars ensue.

While Chinese purchases make up a small sliver of overall sales in the United States, they have had a disproportionate impact on the market for more expensive properties, buying one in 14 homes sold for more than $1 million.

On average, buyers from China, including the mainland, Taiwan and Hong Kong, pay $831,800 for a home, more than three times as much as Americans spend, according to a National Association of Realtors survey.

nar chart


Read full article here:

Posted by on Nov 28, 2015 in Jim's Take on the Market, Market Buzz, Market Conditions, The Future | 0 comments



From the

Andrew Viterbi, co-founder of wireless giant Qualcomm, has listed his sculptural home for $60 million:



From the

Billionaire philanthropist Ted Waitt, who in recent months has bought a house in Beverly Hills and listed another for sale in Hollywood Hills West, has put his estate in La Jolla on the market for $22.9 million.

Posted by on Nov 27, 2015 in Interesting Houses, La Jolla, Rancho Santa Fe | 1 comment