Carlsbad’s Low-Income Housing

The City of Carlsbad needs to build 2,094 very-low and low-income homes over the next ten years.  Hope they get busy on approving those granny flats!

CARLSBAD — Housing is arguably the most pressing issue in the state.

As such, every eight years the state determines the number of housing units, known as the Regional Housing Needs Assessment (RHNA), and distributes those totals to each county. From there, the county breaks down the total for each jurisdiction.

In San Diego County, the region was mandated to 171,685 new units for the 2021-29 cycle, according to the California Housing and Community Development Department (HCD). The San Diego Association of Governments presented the numbers during its July 26 board meeting.

For Carlsbad, it means 3,873 new units must be constructed by the deadline. The council also approved a letter to SANDAG in support of the new methodology during its Aug. 20 meeting.

“Those comments will be considered by the SANDAG board on Sept. 6,” said Debbie Fountain, Carlsbad director of community and economic development. “We did prepare the letter … and is recommending support for that methodology.”

The goal is to increase the housing supply, as California is suffering from a housing shortage. According to the state methodology, 65% of RHNA is distributed to each municipality’s relative to its share of transit stations and stops and 35% is based on the share of jobs.

Carlsbad has no major stops per the methodology, but is the region’s third largest employer at 4.76%. And since Carlsbad has a higher average income than most of the county, more affordable housing units are required.

However, the city’s RHNA allotment decreased by 1,126 units compared to the last cycle.

The proposed methodology requires the city to construct 1,310 very-low income housing, 784 low-income, 750 moderate and 1,029 above-moderate units.

The city’s very-low income housing increased by 398 units over the previous cycle, while moderate and above-moderate units decreased by 312 and 1,303, respectively. The county saw an increase of 9,695 units compared to the fifth cycle.

“We also wanted to get some acknowledgement of the great work Carlsbad has been doing for providing low-income housing,” Fountain added.

Councilwoman Cori Schumacher asked Fountain to provide clarification for the public between the fifth and sixth assessments. Fountain said if approved by SANDAG, the city would be responsible for more very low- and low-income units in the sixth cycle compared to the fifth.

Schumacher said the focus this time around is on jobs, while Fountain added the state set specific standards, such as housing being concentrated around job and transit centers.

“It’s a 65-35 split,” Fountain added. “They looked at the jobs-housing balance. They came down to this more data-driven formula.”

One change the city will face is addressing its density requirements under the Housing Element, Fountain said. As such, she said the city will struggle “a lot” with its Growth Management Plan due to the new housing requirements and methodology.

The city’s letter supports the methodology, but also states the city has made significant strides over the past 25 years due to its Inclusionary Housing Ordinance.

https://www.thecoastnews.com/carlsbads-rhna-allotment-decreases/

Another Comp for Segovia

People almost instantly separate themselves into posers or players by their comments at open houses, and the remarks today ranged from “you’re nuts” to “this will sell in a week”.

Those who are following the market closely will recognize that the entry-level house in the Encinitas School District today starts around $800,000.  Add in the popularity of one-story homes and the general resistance to HOA and Mello-Roos and my listing has many positives.

Here is another comparable home that closed this week that happens to be in the Carlsbad school district (vs the preferred Encinitas school district).  For buyers who can live with an funky one-story floor plan on a larger (though multi-level) lot with no HOA or Mello-Roos, this would have been a potential candidate – and it closed for $995,000 (my listing is priced at $880,000):

Sober-Living Homes

They should identify the locations so homebuyers are aware:

Sober living homes have become a contentious issue with residents in the neighborhoods where they have developed. As a result, the City Council formally approved an ad hoc committee to address them during its July 23 meeting.

Thousands of sober living homes have popped up throughout the state, mostly in Southern California from Los Angeles to Orange and San Diego counties.

Serving on the committee will be council members Keith Blackburn and Barbara Hamilton.

“It would be to address the issue of sober living homes, to engage community stakeholders, listen to and discuss their concerns and recommendations regarding sober living homes and to recommend potential state and local regulatory and legislative strategies for the City Council to pursue,” said Jason Haber, assistant to the city manager.

(more…)

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