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An Insider's Guide to North San Diego County's Coastal Real Estate
Jim Klinge, broker-associate
858-997-3801
klingerealty@gmail.com
Compass
617 Saxony Place, Suite 101
Encinitas, CA 92024
Klinge Realty
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Are you looking for an experienced agent to help you buy or sell a home? Contact Jim the Realtor!

Jim Klinge
Cell/Text: (858) 997-3801
klingerealty@gmail.com
701 Palomar Airport Road, Suite 300
Carlsbad, CA 92011


Category Archive: ‘Realtors Talking Shop’

Sexy Realtor Video?

Here’s a steamy new real estate video that isn’t as sexy as the previous ones we’ve seen, yet the reaction was so strong that the brokerage took it down and cancelled the open house.

The big complaint was that the woman featured wasn’t the woman in the photo, but the guy was visiting her, not the other way around.

The original video was copied before it was taken down, and now this version has over 1M views and 300+ comments:

Posted by on Apr 19, 2019 in Listing Agent Practices, Realtor, Realtors Talking Shop | 1 comment

Open Bidding

Realtors are fighting the idea of open bids? Agents prefer no rules:

Ontario real estate agents are lobbying the province against the mandatory disclosure of offers among competing home buyers in transactions involving multiple bids.

The Ontario Real Estate Association (OREA) sent a bulletin to its 78,000 members this week urging them to contact their MPPs to oppose the compulsory sharing of offer prices and conditions among competing buyers. That’s something the province has said it is considering as part of its planned update to the 2002 Real Estate Business Brokers Act (REBBA).

“Buyers and sellers should have the choice of using an open, transparent process,” said the OREA email.

It says that sharing information about competing bids could lead to the disclosure of personal financial information to any interested parties.

“The government should not force consumers to gamble their life savings in an experimental, mandated open offer process,” said the OREA email signed by association president Karen Cox.

“Hard working realtors like you would face increased red tape,” it warned.

Under the current rules, a real estate agent can only share the details of offers with the property seller.

But consumers should have a choice if all the buyers and the seller agree, said OREA CEO Tim Hudak.

Making the disclosure of offers mandatory “would be a radical change in the real estate market that does not exist anywhere else in North America,” he said.

“This would invoke a brand new process for every real estate transaction where brokers would have to distribute offers to all the other buyers,” said Hudak and that means sharing prices, deposit and closing information, right down to who gets the fridge.

The buyers’ addresses would be included in each of the offer documents, as well as conditions around the need to sell another home or the amount of cash that buyer has on hand for a deposit.

Some sellers would agree to share offer information based on their ideas of fairness for buyers, said Hudak. But all sellers should seek the advice of their realtor, he added.

At least one Toronto agent says his advice would depend on whether he was representing a buyer or seller.

“If I were representing my seller I’d say, ‘no.’ Unless I was mandated to do it, I wouldn’t do it. It’s our job to protect our clients,” said Royal LePage’s Desmond Brown. “If I had a buyer I would want to know as much information as possible.”

Among its 28 recommendations for modernizing the real estate act, OREA is proposing that the government eliminate bully bids — offers that pre-empt the time the seller has set to look at bids on their home. It is also recommends the elimination of escalation clauses, offers that specify the buyer will exceed the best bid by a certain amount.

The Toronto Real Estate Board (TREB) said it understands, “the fairness angle,” of disclosing competing offer details. “But this will also be a tricky area for the government to attempt to legislate,” said a statement attributed to board CEO John DiMichele.

“Disclosing bids puts realtors in conflict with their seller clients,” he said.

In regard to bully bids, the government would need to either require sellers to look at all offers as they come in or not accept any until a certain date.

“We prefer less government intervention in the marketplace,” said the statement.

Link to Article

Posted by on Apr 18, 2019 in Auctions, Jim's Take on the Market, Listing Agent Practices, Realtor, Realtor Training, Realtors Talking Shop | 2 comments

Price Reductions Already

The percentages are quite a bit higher this year. The title of the graph could be ‘Sellers Who Are Having No Showings’ because most are (overly) optimistic this early in the selling season and hold tight on price until later.  Something must be rattling them – like no showings.

An excerpt from the UT article:

Home price reductions are still common when the market is red hot. It is sometimes a selling tactic — although not usually considered a good one — to price a home higher and then come down so the buyer feels like they are getting a deal. But, the number of reductions recently shows a big change.

For instance, 8.5 percent of homes had price reductions in November 2016. In November 2018, there were 29.4 percent.

Jason Cassity, a real estate agent based downtown, said the industry has a problem shifting when there has been a big change — such as a downturn in sales at the end of last year. He said some agents are operating like there will still be a bidding war.

“If you continue pricing like it is 2016, it is going to sit on the market a long time,” he said. “Or you are going to be one of those 20 percent (in February) that have to price reduce.”

He said a lot of the reductions he has seen were listings marked up too high out of the gate, something a lot of agents could get away with for years. He said sometimes homes are priced overly high just to meet sellers’ expectation of a huge payday, not the actual value.

Cassity said he presents news articles about the real estate market to clients before they decide on what price they are going to market with.

Link to Full Article

Posted by on Mar 15, 2019 in Jim's Take on the Market, Listing Agent Practices, Market Conditions, Realtor, Realtors Talking Shop, Thinking of Buying?, Thinking of Selling? | 1 comment

Know the Inventory

Here’s a good example of what makes us old-school agents good at our job – we know the inventory.  Seeing the new listings every week enables us to recognize the features/nuances of each home and how they compare to other active, pending, and sold listings. It also gives us a chance to network with the other agents, get tips, and build alliances – and find good matches for our buyers.

You never see discount or disrupter agents on tour – ever:

Posted by on Feb 28, 2019 in Jim's Take on the Market, Realtor, Realtors Talking Shop | 0 comments

DRE on Coming Soons

The DRE has finally issued ‘guidance’ on the Coming Soons.  Ignored are these facts about agents making off-market deals with no MLS exposure:

  1. We see top agents doing it regularly,
  2. There is no enforcement whatsoever, and
  3. You give us the forms to CYA (last paragraph).

Burying this advice in the back of the bulletin isn’t enough.  Until we see realtors being prosecuted and found guilty, nothing will change.

DRE Weighs In on “Coming Soon” Advertising: “Be Sure to Maintain Fiduciary Responsibility for Your Client or Face Civil and Regulatory Liability”

The Department of Real Estate has included in its 2018 Winter Real Estate Bulletin an article which discusses the risks of “Coming Soon” marketing. It includes a statement of the DRE’s view of “best practices” for listing agents:

“Coming Soon” advertising CAN benefit the seller if handled properly. Such advertising can increase exposure time of the property and generate interest in the public about a soon-to-be marketed property, helping potential purchasers prepare to tour the property or make an offer when the property is put up for sale. A practice of “Coming Soon” advertising coupled with initially not showing the property is sometimes known as a “Coming Soon—No Showing” strategy (or similar) and can well serve a client. In such a strategy, the property may show as “Coming Soon” on a multiple listing service, but also as not yet being shown to potential buyers. After a time, the property is broadly marketed as for sale. There are likely multiple listing service requirements that must be met to advertise a property as “Coming Soon—No Showing” or similar.

The potential conflict a “Coming Soon” strategy can have with a licensee’s fiduciary duty comes when the listing agent begins accepting offers before the property is exposed to a larger audience via a multiple listing service or by other means. When a property is not exposed to the full market, a client’s best interests might not be served, even when a full price offer is received (because the property may well have sold above the marketed price if better advertised). Imagine the dilemma for a listing agent if a seller accepts an offer on a poorly marketed property and then receives much higher backup offers as the property receives greater exposure.

At a minimum, an agent should disclose that a better sales price could be obtained if the property were to be marketed on a multiple listing service and obtain the seller’s prior written permission that she or he agrees to not fully market the property.

A listing agent who encourages the use of a “Coming Soon” program, without broadly advertising a property via a multiple listing service or other means, especially exposes himself/herself to the potential for an increased chance of civil liability and regulatory action when the agent also then represents the buyer in a dual agent capacity. Such a dual agent would need to be able to demonstrate that the agent acted in the best interests of the seller to obtain a purchase price that was as high as could be expected for a fully marketed property. This agent, who receives commissions on both ends of the transaction, could face scrutiny questioning whether they worked to obtain the best offer possible for the seller or was acting in such a capacity for personal financial gain.

The following are some best practices for agents when representing a seller:

• Market the property via multiple listing service or other broad advertising means.
• Make sure the seller agrees to and understands how the property will be marketed.
• If using a “Coming Soon” strategy, do not accept and act on offers until a property has been broadly marketed.
• If the property will not be fully marketed, obtain prior written permission from the seller that demonstrates they understand that such a “Coming Soon” strategy may not result in receiving the best sales price.
• Avoid double-ending a property that is not fully marketed—it is best to refer potential buyers to another agent.

The C.A.R. Residential Listing Agreement explains the benefits to the seller of using the MLS and the impact of opting out.

For the seller to instruct the agent to opt out of the MLS, the seller and broker must initial paragraph 5 of the RLA. Additionally, the seller must sign form SELM (Seller Instruction to Exclude Listing from Multiple Listing Service) or the comparable form provided by the MLS.

Link to Bulletin

Posted by on Feb 28, 2019 in Coming Soon, Ethics, Jim's Take on the Market, Realtor, Realtors Talking Shop | 3 comments

NRT Rips Compass

Today, Ryan Gorman, the CEO of NRT which owns Realogy (Coldwell Banker, Century 21, Corcoran, etc.) took a major shot at Compass.

He released this two-page ‘questionnaire’ for his agents to use when interviewing with Compass, but he sure comes off as desperate and paranoid:

Help-Agents-Avoid-Being-Thrown-Off-Course-by-a-Spinning-Compass-CB-NRT

Our CEO, Robert Reffkin, shrugged it off, which is fine and what he should do:

“What you talk about is a representation of what you are focused on,” Reffkin said. “We don’t tear down competitors, we don’t pay attention to the noise, what we focus on is empowering agents.”

But as a Compass guy, I’m going to address some of Ryan’s specific concerns for those consumers and agents who might be curious and want to know the truth:

1. Robert Reffkin told us that because we’re in the Top 20 markets, the company was going to concentrate on supporting and growing those already in play – which sounds great to us agents.  I don’t know how you rate the Top 20, but here’s where we are: Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Denver, Houston, Los Angeles, Miami, New York City, Orange County, Philadelphia, San Francisco, San Diego, Seattle, and Washington D.C., plus nine other smaller cities – which makes 24 markets.  Close enough.

2. Compass agents grow their business quickly after joining Compass? I don’t remember that claim specifically, but every agent knows your business usually takes a hit when you change companies.  Ryan said York at MoxiWorks contradicted the claim, but that’s not true. York said that the Compass market share was lower than claimed, but he checked the Compass production only, when Compass said it was the agents’ cumulative total for the year.  Agents count their annual sales volume, regardless of their brokerage, so the Compass and MoxiWorks measurements were apples and oranges – for Ryan to misconstrue what happened is disingenuous.

3. Ryan says Cigna isn’t our insurance company, but looks like they are to me:

We saved $4,000+ per year and have a lower deductible.

4. Ryan claims Compass is losing money and wants to know about the turn-around plan?  There’s $1 billion in the bank, and Compass will likely do an IPO in the next 24 months.  But agents are focused on selling homes – if we make any money on stocks or stock options, it will be icing on the cake.

5. Ryan said that Compass ‘strongly encourages’ agents to use the in-house tools. Nobody has ever asked or told me to use the Compass tools.  Furthermore, the Compass agents I know are all seasoned professionals who used their own tools long before working at Compass.

After his release went public, Ryan said this:

“I believe competition raises the level of play, and I welcome it,” Gorman said. “But when a competitor fails to uphold the basic ethics and integrity that this industry has together worked so hard to build, and puts the people I care about in jeopardy, I cannot sit on my hands.”

“The ‘talk’ coming from Compass behind closed doors is disturbing, and yet even in public forums, such as this publication, the inconsistencies, exaggerations and flip-flops by Compass executives are deeply concerning.”

The NRT sales volume is around 5x what we sell at Compass, and this guy goes ballistic over half-truths and innuendo, most of which is wrong or inconsequential?  Why?

Posted by on Feb 21, 2019 in About the author, Compass, Jim's Take on the Market, Realtor, Realtor Training, Realtors Talking Shop | 4 comments

Real Estate for the Older Crowd

According to the Realtors Confidence Index national survey, 89% of home sellers were at least 35 years old, and two-thirds were selling their primary residence:

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Of those who bought a home, 72% were at least 35 years old, and 40% came from a home they owned. Mix of those buying up or down? Maybe 50/50?

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The REALTORS® Confidence Index is a key indicator of housing market strength based on a monthly survey sent to over 50,000 real estate practitioners. Practitioners are asked about their expectations for home sales, prices and market conditions.

Link to NAR Survey

Posted by on Feb 13, 2019 in Boomers, Jim's Take on the Market, Market Conditions, Realtor, Realtors Talking Shop | 0 comments

The End is Near

click on image for their youtube video

Our broker-cooperation model of sharing listings though the MLS has been the lifeblood of selling homes since the early 1960s.  But it is breaking down right before our eyes.

It’s not going to happen all at once, or even happen out in the open.  Instead, the sharing of listings through the MLS will just quietly go away.

Whether it is the emergence of the PLS, or brokerages developing their own Coming Soon program, or individual agents doing off-market sales out of sight, the sharing of listings is doomed – even though it is what’s best for consumers and agents alike.

Can we just admit it, and carry on like the commercial brokers do?

Everybody for themselves!

The first thing to do is to stop the automatic listing feeds to Zillow/Trulia, and make it broker-optional, which is what’s happening in Las Vegas.

Agents may choose to upload their MLS listings to Zillow and other portals, or maybe not.  But what about Redfin and other brokerages who get their listings directly from the MLS?  Once agents see the benefits of eliminating portals, why would they bother with the MLS at all?

Maybe agents with a hot new listing will just wait a few days or weeks to see if they can find their own buyer first.  Or maybe another agent in the office might have someone?  We already see this happening every day.

The MLS will be the marketplace of last resort.

We should embrace this change, and tell consumers that they have to go to each company’s website – or even each individual agent’s website – to find the hot new buys.  At least they would know the honest truth!

I’m convinced that industry players don’t see this coming.  They don’t see what happens (or they look the other way) when listing distribution is left in the hands of the listing agents themselves.

Yes, thank you for giving us the ability to choose which platforms to use to market our listings – I appreciate having choices. But when you take the automation away, and make it a manual choice for each listing, agents will find it hard to resist the temptation to limit with whom they share their listings.

Posted by on Nov 9, 2018 in Jim's Take on the Market, Listing Agent Practices, Realtor, Realtors Talking Shop, Why You Should List With Jim | 1 comment

Pocket Listings / Coming Soon

More tip-toeing around the Coming Soon topic in Realtor Magazine yesterday:

The surge in off-market “pocket listings”—those held off the MLS in favor of secret channels and networks between agents or within a brokerage—is a growing issue in the real estate industry.

In markets starved for inventory, real estate professionals are struggling with being kept out of these secret dealings for homes that their buyers could potentially want.

In markets such as Los Angeles, for example, reports say that up to 30 percent of sales are being withheld from the MLS for the sake of more private channels, according to some brokerage estimates.

In response, some brokerages—and even MLSs—are looking for ways to expose these listings to a larger audience. One of many recent launches in the past month came from the brokerage Compass, which allows its real estate agents to post their listings to Compass’ website days before sharing them with the local MLS and third-party portals, like realtor.com®. “Compass Coming Soon” is available nationwide in markets where the brokerage operates.

“This will help our agents get a head start on marketing while still getting the property ready for market,” Compass CEO Robert Reffkin reportedly shared with Compass real estate professionals in an email. “By harnessing the power of pre-marketing, [the listing] actually shows up twice in everyone’s alerts: once when it hits Compass.com, and again when it hits the open market, doubling potential exposure.”

Pacific Union International, which Compass acquired in late August, had launched its own solution to handling the disruption from the growing prevalence of pocket listings in May with “Private View,” debuting $400 million worth of exclusive property offerings. But its portal of off-MLS listings can be viewed by any registered users—real estate professionals from other brokerages as well as the general public. Registered users can see exclusively signed listings before they’re publicized on the MLS. The portal is currently available in northern and southern California.

In September, Long & Foster launched its own exclusive Coming Soon Portal to promote upcoming listings to its agents before they are on the market. It’s a way to gauge interest and create early demand for a property before it hits the MLS.

“Our agent-to-agent portal allows our sales associates exclusive access to Long & Foster properties that are not yet in the MLS,” Barry Redler, chief marketing officer for The Long & Foster Companies, said in a statement announcing the portal. “Having this platform not only allows us to respond to certain seller requests but also gives our agents a leg up on the competition by helping their buyers more easily find a home in a tight inventory market.”

MLSs are searching for the answer to expose these homes listed for sale, which the seller may wish to keep secret. The Chicago area MLS, Midwest Real Estate Data, launched the Private Listing Network in 2016 as a separate feed to share information to registered brokers about “coming soon” listings. These are not displayed publicly. MRED officials cite it as a way for real estate professionals in their area to premarket listings that aren’t ready to show yet or that are in the process of being renovated, repaired, or staged prior to being marketed publicly. It’s also a way to test the price, as a range can be entered.

But some brokerages and MLSs are taking a firm stance against the practice of pocket listings or “coming soon” forms of premarketing. Since 2013, Northwest Multiple Listing Service—serving the Seattle area—has prohibited its members from promoting or advertising a property until it is listed in the MLS.

Off-MLS deals amplify concerns about limiting exposure of the property “to a select group of agents to the detriment of the seller and other MLS members,” Tom Hurdelbrink, president and CEO of NWMLS, told REALTOR® Magazine.

Nobody wants to project how this will play out, but it seems obvious.  Every brokerage will operate a Coming Soon program, and the MLS will become the marketplace of last resort.

https://magazine.realtor/daily-news/2018/10/23/brokerages-wrestle-with-growth-of-pocket-listings

The photo from the article:

Posted by on Oct 24, 2018 in Coming Soon, Compass, Jim's Take on the Market, Listing Agent Practices, Pocket Listings, Realtor, Realtors Talking Shop | 1 comment

Robotic Real Estate

Below is the evidence put forth by a Bay Area realtor to show two things:

  1. Redfin home-value estimates are tied to the list price, and their estimates are increased as they gauge the traffic.
  2. Buyers are assuming the Redfin estimates to be accurate, and rely on them when making an offer.

In the beginning, zestimates were thought to be wildly inaccurate, and dismissed. But now that portals have been around this long, are consumers putting too much trust into the data received? It appears so.

Are buyers satisfied with internet values now?  Are they subconsciously thinking that the estimates are close enough AND that everyone else does too?

Will future home values be determined by internet traffic?

Click below for his case:

Read More

Posted by on Oct 2, 2018 in Jim's Take on the Market, Realtor, Realtors Talking Shop, Why You Should Hire Jim as your Buyer's Agent, Why You Should List With Jim | 5 comments