Del Mar Modern Classic

The Johnson House was built in 1962 through a collaboration of the The Johnson Family, Bob Jones the Architect/Friend, and builder Herb Turner. This home was originally designed to take full advantage of the scenery around the home through the use of floor to ceiling glass walls, sliding glass doors to bring the outside in, and several different outdoor spaces. Inside the home you will find many of the original features of the home, such as the exposed post and beam architecture.

3 br/2 ba, 2,130sf built on a 11,900sf lot in 1962

SP = $2,670,000

Del Mar Airport

We were scheduled to fly out of JFK last night at 7:35pm, which seemed reasonable because it was barely snowing and the temperature was in the low-30s. Certainly the airport and Delta Airlines can handle that!

We left at 4:45am eastern time!

I think we spent more time on the tarmac than in the air!

We missed the end of the Bing Crosby season, but Cheryl went and captured this double rainbow:

It made me think of Bing’s famous song:

Where the turf meets the surf

Down at old Del Mar

Take a plane

Take a train

Take a car.

There is a smile on every face

And a winner in each race

Where the turf meets the surf

At Del Mar.

The train and car is understandable, but what about taking a plane?

Did you know that Del Mar Airport used to exist? These are from the mid-1960s:

You can see that the new I-5 freeway was built right over the runway!

Del Mar Bluff Collapse

Link to UT article

The Coaster will be taking the day off to monitor the bluff collapse, but they plan to be running a regular schedule tomorrow.  From this angle, it looks like there might be a concrete foundation under the tracks – but is that enough for you to ride the train tomorrow?

The heavy rainstorms over the last 48 hours have caused a washout adjacent to the coastal railroad tracks along the Del Mar Bluffs just south of Coast Boulevard which support COASTER, Amtrak, and BNSF operations. At this time, all trains can safely operate at restricted speeds through the area based on site reviews and inspections conducted by railroad engineers. NCTD and its contractors will have personnel on-site monitoring trains as they pass through the area until repairs have been completed on the tracks.

In order to repair the washout area, NCTD will be closing the tracks south of Solana Beach train station and implementing bus replacement service beginning at 6:00 a.m. on Saturday, November 30, 2019.  

Following is detailed information about the operating plan for Saturday.

    • COASTER: COASTER trains will run a regular Saturday service schedule from Oceanside Transit Center to Solana Beach COASTER station. Passengers will be bus bridged between the Solana Beach train station and Santa Fe Depot. Northbound COASTER passengers who board the COASTER south of Solana Beach station will be bussed all the way to Oceanside Transit Center.  Passengers between Solana Beach station and Oceanside Transit Center going north will be served by the train per the regular schedule.
    • Amtrak Pacific Surfliner: Service and schedule changes will be in effect for Amtrak. Please visit PacificSurfliner.com or call 800-872-7245 for more information.

Regular scheduled train service will resume on Sunday, December 1 for both COASTER and Amtrak.

“Safety is NCTD’s top priority,” said NCTD Executive Director Matthew Tucker. “NCTD is committed to acting proactively to ensure that passenger and freight operations can be safely operated.  NCTD and the San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG) are advancing phased improvements to make the Bluffs more resilient and prevent service impacts like this washout.”

Del Mar Beach Retreat

There have been home sales of $22 million and $23 million on the Del Mar oceanfront in the last 60 days. Hat tip to Richard and ‘just some guy’ for sending this in (the next Coastal Commission meeting is tomorrow):

Del Mar is gearing up for a tussle with the California Coastal Commission over the best way to adapt to rising sea levels, an issue with statewide implications.

The city has taken the position that one of the Coastal Commission’s basic strategies, called “managed retreat” or sometimes “planned retreat,” will not work in Del Mar.

“We have a plan, and we stand by our plan,” Del Mar Councilman Dwight Worden said Friday.

The City Council is scheduled to review its sea-level rise adaptation plan tonight (Oct 7) in preparation for a Coastal Commission hearing on Oct. 16. The commission’s staff has recommended its board reject Del Mar’s plan unless the city agrees to a list of 25 modifications that Worden said could be a “back door” to managed retreat.

(more…)

Del Mar Flood Zone

The new flood map goes into effect in December, and it shows the ‘base flood elevation’ being six feet higher than it was on the previous map.  This article is about the city council meeting on Monday, where no action was taken but notes that the Coastal Commission is preparing their recommended changes to Del Mar’s Local Coastal Plan:

https://www.delmartimes.net/news/story/2019-07-17/del-mar-awaits-state-federal-coastal-actions

An excerpt:

Ongoing dialogue between the city and commission administrators has provoked fears among beach-area homeowners that the state body could impose onerous requirements in response to sea-level rise.

Of major concern is that the city adopted a sea-level rise adaptation plan that outlines various measures to cope with the rising sea. The plan, however, rejects the concept of “managed retreat,” in which property owners would have to relocate their homes and buildings to higher ground to avoid flooding.

City officials determined managed retreat is impractical for Del Mar, the county’s smallest city. The city analysis concluded there would be nowhere for buildings to be relocated and it would destroy property values in the millions and even tens of millions of dollars. The median home value in Del Mar is about $2.5 million, according to online sources, but beach front homes run much higher.

In contrast, Del Mar’s adaptation plan calls for measures such as sand replenishment and management, flood control measures such as dredging, and ongoing monitoring and analysis of the effects of the rising sea level.

A number of residents filed letters with the city before Monday’s meeting and many in attendance wore stickers with red “say no” bars over the term “trigger points.”

The sticker and comments were intended to express opposition to any commission attempt to establish thresholds that, when reached, would trigger required “managed retreat” responses by the city.

Also, city officials oppose the commission’s definition of existing development as structures that were built in the coastal zone before the commission’s establishment in 1977.

“Please listen to Del Mar residents. Say no to trigger points, say no to new definitions of existing development and say no to the California Coastal Commission,” urged Jerry Jacobs, president of the Del Mar Beach Preservation Coalition.

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