The Ennis House Sells

Hat tip to Susie for sending in the article about the Ennis House selling for $18 million:

Link to Article

Since last week, when Frank Lloyd Wright’s iconic Ennis House sold for a record-shattering $18 million — far and away the most ever paid for a Wright-designed home — curious minds have wondered who would buy such an idiosyncratic and outrageously high-maintenance compound for such a lofty sum.

Perhaps surprisingly, property records have now cleared and they show the house was acquired by an entity easily linked to a seasoned former PR executive named Cindy Capobianco and her environmentalist/philanthropist husband Robert Rosenheck, the founders of marijuana juggernaut Lord Jones, a luxury beauty brand that sells cannabis-infused body lotions, gels, gumdrops, bath salts and cosmetics.

Two months ago, after just four years in business, Lord Jones — which was the first cannabis brand to be sold in Sephora, Equinox and other high-end locations — was acquired in a $300 million deal by the publicly-traded Cronos Group.

After receiving that mega-millions business lottery win of sorts, Capobianco and Rosenheck wasted little time in investing a portion of the big score into their cinematic Mayan Revival new residence. Designed by the elder Wright and built by his son in 1924, the internationally famous structure was hewn almost entirely from 27,000 decomposed granite blocks and has been featured in numerous Hollywood productions — perhaps most notably, in 1982’s “Blade Runner.”

The Ennis House endured severe structural damage during the 1994 Northridge earthquake, and it slipped into a state of disrepair that continued until 2011, when it was purchased for $4.5 million by supermarket billionaire and noted architecture preservationist Ron Burkle, who commenced a years-long renovation and restoration of the premises. Last summer, amid a massive wave of publicity, the upgraded property was put up for sale with a sanity-defying $23 million pricetag.

Although marketing materials stated that Burkle invested “nearly $17 million” into renovations for the property — meaning the $18 million sale price represented a multimillion-dollar financial loss to his pocketbook — a Burkle associate clarified to Dirt that the $17 million figure included $6.4 million in a FEMA grant and a $4.5 million construction loan received by the Ennis House Foundation to fund structural stabilizations. In actuality, it would appear Burkle walked with a substantial profit on his labor of love.

Guests to the Capobianco-Rosenheck-Ennis House can light up in either the monolithic masterpiece’s main house or its detached guesthouse/garage combo, which total up to more than 6,000 square feet of living space. From its vantage point high in the Los Feliz hills, the compound sports jetliner-like views over the basin below, and head-on vistas of the Downtown L.A. skyline.

Link to Photos

Tiny Homes Together

Chances are, you have had the thought of moving away and being surrounded with the people you love the most. These best friends are actually doing it.

While your ideal “get away from it all” escape may be an island retreat, or mountain cabin in the middle of a forest, these 8 friends had another idea: build an eco-town made out of tiny homes in good ol’ Texas.

“The cabin designed by architect Matt Garcia cost around $40,000 each and is environmental-friendly. The cabins are designed to be sustainable and make the most of the surroundings. The four couples named their settlement ‘Llano Exit Strategy’ and are looking to retire on the property,”

Even though they already lived close to each other, they didn’t see each other as often as they liked due to their busy schedules. Apart from the cabins, there is also a large communal kitchen and a guest bedroom for when other friends and family come to visit. There’s large, stainless-steel appliances, including a commercial range and clear-glass fridge.

https://mysticalraven.com/adventures/16786/best-friends-build-their-own-tiny-town-so-they-can-retire-and-grow-old-together

Modern Home Tour Oct. 12th

Tour the Homes.

Meet the Architects & Designers.

GET INSPIRED!

You know “that house” you pass by every day?

The San Diego Modern Home Tour is your chance to GET INSIDE and meet the architects, builders and designers that made it happen – and maybe even ask a question or two about your that special project playing around in the back of your own mind!

Sat, October 12, 2019

11:00 AM – 5:00 PM PDT

http://mads.media/2019sdmod/

Architecture Shows

Netflix isn’t just a great service for relaxing or procrastinating — it can also be a great learning tool for architecture and urbanism. Here are examples — including both series and documentaries — for architecture-related viewing that, in addition to being entertaining, can help broaden your knowledge.

https://www.archdaily.com/876708/6-must-see-architecture-documentaries-and-series-on-netflix

A sample:

Manny’s House

MLB star Manny Machado has swung for the fences in the Sunshine State, shelling out $11.3 million for a waterfront mansion in Coral Gables, Fla.

It’s a massive sum, but only about half of the estate’s original asking price of $22 million, records show.

The four-time All-Star is putting his new contract to good use. After a season with the Dodgers, Machado inked a 10-year deal with the Padres earlier this year worth $300 million. At the time, it was the largest free-agent contract in the history of North American sports.

Claiming an acre in the gated community of Tahiti Beach, the property overlooks Biscayne Bay with 121 feet of water frontage. The 8,300-square-foot home sits at the end of a spacious front lawn framed by palm trees.

Link to LATimes

Now it’s for rent for $30,000 per month:

Link to Zillow

Shulman Exhibition

Architectural photographer Julius Shulman (1910 – 2009) shot over 200 projects in San Diego.

His clients were architects, publishers, construction companies, and developers, and included notable San Diego architects Lloyd Ruocco, Sim Bruce Richards, Henry Hester, and Frederick Liebhardt. Shulman’s work, spanning seven decades, documented the region’s evolving 20th century architectural landscape, and he played an instrumental role in sharing California’s unique post-War modernism with a wide audience.

This exhibition presents selected photographs from Julius Shulman’s projects in La Jolla, represented in both vintage and contemporary prints, and ephemera that contextualize this historically significant work.

Date And Time

Fri, September 27, 2019

5:00 PM – 7:00 PM PDT

Location

La Jolla Historical Society

780 Prospect Street

La Jolla , CA 92037

Free Show – Register Here

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