Over List

This is testimony to what works.

Carmel Valley is known to have plenty of drab, older tract houses that lack the snappy look that buyers expect when paying upwards of $2 million dollars.

But when a fully remodeled home comes on the market, buyers take notice.  There were multiple offers on this one, and it closed for $51,000 over its $1,699,000 list price. It is the highest price ever on this street by +11%:

Bonsall Horse Ranch

Check out my listing of a complete 5.5-acre horse ranch with two huge riding arenas, equicisor, 2 tack rooms, fenced pasture areas and stalls for 17 with plans/materials for 12 more!

Two detached cottages, each with their own kitchens, updated bathrooms, and individual septic systems make an ideal set-up for the owner-user.

Three electric gates for easy access to the whole property, 10,000-gallon water tank with a working well that pumps 70 GPM, plus access to riding trails too! Zoning allows ten horses per acre.

LP = $995,000.

The Documentary-Film Premiere

The documentary-film premiere went great on Saturday at Cinepolis, where we had about 80 people view the movie – and they liked it! You’ll see it on iTunes on June 4th – here is a partial description from the website www.ownedfilm.com

The United States’ postwar housing policy created the world’s largest middle class. It also set America on two divergent paths — one of imagined wealth, propped up by speculation and endless booms and busts, and the other in systematically defunded, segregated communities, where “the American dream” feels hopelessly out of reach.

Owned is a fever dream vision into the dark history behind the US housing economy. Tracking its overtly racist beginnings and its unbridled commoditization, the film exposes a foundational story that few Americans understand as their own.

In 2008, the US housing market became the epicenter of an unprecedented global economic collapse. In the years since, protests in cities like Baltimore have highlighted the stark racial disparities that define many American cities. The crash of suburbia and urban unrest are not unrelated — they are two sides of the same coin, two divergent paths set in motion by the United States’ post-war housing policy.

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