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Are you looking for an experienced agent to help you buy or sell a home? Contact Jim the Realtor!

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Category Archive: ‘Thinking of Selling?’

Hire Jim to Sell Your House!

When a buyer’s agent calls the listing office to inquire about making an offer, the usual response is, “Send it in, and we’ll get back to you.” More questions don’t reveal much else, and the buyer’s agent is left wondering if there is any hope of selling a house.

There is big money being thrown around these days, and how your listing agent operates determines your fate.  Sellers should hire a agent who demonstrates what they do to sell your house for top dollar, not just process your paperwork.

Here’s an example of how I work:

Posted by on Jun 24, 2017 in About the author, Jim's Take on the Market, Listing Agent Practices, Realtor, Thinking of Selling?, Why You Should List With Jim | 6 comments

The Unwanted McMansion

A great article from realtor.com. Excerpts:

As baby boomers look to downsize out of their suburban McMansions, a generational showdown is looming: Millennials might be coming into their own as the nation’s biggest group of first-time home buyers, but they aren’t exactly lining up with bids in hand for those large, expensive homes in the sleepier suburbs. Instead, they’re looking for a different kind of home—the same ones, in fact, that the empty nesters are looking to buy.

It’s a battle of the millennials vs. baby boomers playing out in the nation’s suburban housing markets.

Younger and older generations alike are gravitating toward smaller dwellings in more urban, walkable suburbs and cities, with restaurants and coffee shops around the corner. It’s leading to a real estate traffic jam: Increasingly, boomers are getting stuck, because most can’t buy the home of their dreams until they unload their current ones. And many millennials have neither the desire nor the means to help them out.

“What you have is everyone chasing the same type of home,” says Rick Palacios, director of research at John Burns Real Estate Consulting. “More and more buyers of all ages want to avoid having to deal with a huge yard and all the upkeep and the costs to maintain [a larger] home.”

It’s creating an odd imbalance in a real estate market—a disruption to what has long been considered the traditional generational housing life cycle. And it’s leaving many would-be buyers out in the cold.

When they do make that move to the suburbs, millennials often seek more walkable towns that have many of the urban amenities they’re used to, like bike lanes, social events, and lots of shops and restaurants.

“What’s really attracting millennials are the communities that are bringing the urban flavor out to nonurban towns,” Palacios says. “They don’t want the traditional  massive homes and big yards. They want smaller homes and cool things to do.”

“It’s more important to have proximity to the lifestyle they want,” says Jason Dorsey, president and researcher at the Center for Generational Kinetics, focused on millennials and Generation Z. “Their living room is actually the park outside the condo.”

It’s not just the size of boomers’ homes that is a turnoff; it’s also the style. Times and tastes have changed, and today both boomers and millennials are attracted to modern, open floor plans—which aren’t common in the older homes that boomers are hoping to unload. Boomers like the flexibility of these spaces for aging in place, and millennials like the clean design.

And while they’re willing to compromise on size, millennials are less willing to bite the bullet on amenities. Weened on HGTV, they want high-end finishes, nice countertops, upscale appliances, and luxurious bathrooms.

“They’ll buy a smaller house with fancier amenities, close to town, rather than chase square footage,” Dorsey says.

As for Generation X, having weathered the Great Recession during what should have been their prime earning years, they now have to save for their kids’ college expenses, their retirement, and caring for their aging parents. So they’re not likely to trade up from their starter homes. And if they do, many prefer an easier-to-maintain smaller home in a community with activities they enjoy—just like those millennials and boomers, Dorsey says.

Meanwhile, since the boomers see their home as their nest egg, they’re not all willing to reduce their asking price and shortchange their retirement accounts, says Dorsey. So more of them end up staying put.

“There certainly was a lot of speculation about what would happen if the boomers tried to sell their houses en masse, and whether that would flood the market with a supply of large homes that the younger population didn’t want—or couldn’t afford—to buy,” Porter says. But “the boomers do seem to be moving less and aging in place more.”

Read full article HERE.

Posted by on Jun 9, 2017 in Boomer Liquidations, Boomers, Jim's Take on the Market, The Future, Thinking of Buying?, Thinking of Selling? | 5 comments

SD Spring Selling Season Starts Now

Here is a good visual aid that shows how closed sales usually jump in March – and those are sales that began in January and February.

Sales last March were 39% higher than in February!

This year, we’re coming in hot too.  Sales in the last four months of 2016 were similar to those in the frenzied 2013!

Click here for more of Rich Toscano’s work:

https://piggington.com/december_2016_housing_data

Posted by on Feb 7, 2017 in Frenzy, Jim's Take on the Market, Spring Kick, Thinking of Buying?, Thinking of Selling? | 0 comments

Move While You Are Younger

There are already people who have decided to buy and/or sell this year, and to those folks I’ll say in advance – congratulations, and I’d like to help you!

I’d like to reach out those who are thinking of putting off the move for another month or year.

Here are reasons why you should re-consider:

  1. The actual moving is mentally and physically taxing.  Even if you have plenty of family to help sort through the junk and pack everything up, you will want to have a say in many of the decisions.
  2.  Moving to a new home almost always means getting accustomed to a new home, area, amenities, and basic things to live.  You want to be on top of your game to endure that many changes.
  3.  People are buying one-story homes in advance because of the lack of supply and the pressure on pricing – demand is heavy, and supply is light!
  4.  The current administration could mess with the tax law, and tweak the $500,000 tax-free profit you have coming from your home sale.
  5.  The move is very likely to be more difficult than you think!

Recently, I had a widow move to a retirement facility after her husband had passed away (she was younger).  We lamented that if they would have moved together, he would have loved the new place, and she would have had a network of friends already built by the time he passed.

If you are getting up in years, and know that you have at least one more move in you before you’re done, don’t wait too long.  Seventy years old is about the latest anyone should move, and 60 years old is recommended.  You want to enjoy a few years at the new spot!

Don’t wait too long!

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Posted by on Feb 6, 2017 in Boomer Liquidations, Boomers, Jim's Take on the Market, One-Story, Thinking of Buying?, Thinking of Selling? | 1 comment

Traffic Doesn’t Equal Offers 2

Don’t feel bad for that last seller – somebody will come along and pay him what he wants.  Many homes are sold to buyers who are represented by one of the new-age realtors fresh out of real estate school who work for a team.

The good veteran agents are so sick of the frustration that they’re scrambling to build a team of inexperienced agents who will do the grunt work.  There isn’t much oversight on whether the price paid is fair; instead, there is more pressure to get another sale on the board.

New and inexperienced agents get so excited about showing a new listing that if it has any shiny stuff, they go berserk and puke all over the listing agent, giving the impression that the buyers will pay anything for the house.  When I’m showing a house, people think that I’m just a boring old dude because I don’t say much.  It never occurs to them that I’m protecting my fiduciary duty to my buyer by NOT spewing superlatives.

The problem starts when listing agents don’t properly prepare their sellers for the initial onslaught – instead, they get caught up in it too, and think that all the jumping around means that offers will be pouring in any minute.

It used to be that way, but not any more.

If lookers don’t make an offer within 24 hours, they usually don’t make one.  It’s too easy to play it safe, and wait for the next one.

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Posted by on Jan 17, 2017 in Jim's Take on the Market, Thinking of Buying?, Thinking of Selling?, Why You Should Hire Jim as your Buyer's Agent, Why You Should List With Jim | 0 comments

Traffic Doesn’t Equal Offers

By now, the low-inventory/fast-market has trained the motivated buyers to be on red alert.  If a new listing pops up that looks remotely interesting, those buyers know to get over there quick for a peek.

This presents a major problem for the sellers and listing agent.

Once the parade of lookers descends upon the new meat within hours, it is irresistible for the ego to go wild, and it causes sellers and listing agents to have visions of lottery-type money.

It is so much fun, they want it to last forever! They are so excited!

Savvy buyers know that if this is THE house, they need to make an offer promptly.  It makes the equation quite simple – sellers will receive offers from the motivated buyers within the first 2-3 days.  All you have to do is counter for every buyer’s highest-and-best offer, and by Day Four the buyer who will pay the most will emerge.

But what usually happens?

The overly optimistic buyer-agents get all giddy and tell the listing agent that they think they will be making an offer.  But a funny thing happens to buyers once they roll down the street for a couple of blocks – all the reasons NOT to buy that house come up, and most buyers talk themselves right out of it.  At least half of the people who threaten to make an offer never do.

What if you are a motivated buyer, and make a great offer in the first 1-2 days?  It happens regularly that sellers and listing agents will pooh-pooh a great early offer, and hope that there are two in the bush.

What can buyers do?  You only have one option, and that is to walk away if you don’t get a response by the time the offer expires.  At least if you threaten to quit, it should hopefully get their full attention.

Sellers and listing agents think that lots of visitors = lots of offers.  But most visitors don’t offer – they’re just visiting.  In virtually every case, the no-offer rate is at least 90%, but sellers ignore that and are convinced there has to be two or more in the bush.

Here’s today’s example:

The seller paid in the low $700,000s in late-2012, and didn’t add anything but lipstick since. We initially offered $1,275,000 last week, and sure got the feeling that we were getting shopped around – the listing agent kept reminding me that there were other offers expected.  So we put a deadline of 1:00pm today to accept our $1,300,000 counter-offer.  Two hours after our deadline, the seller countered $1,339,000, which was just $6,000 under their first counter.  They called it their final offer, and it wasn’t a multiple-counter, so no other offers were on the table.

The sellers paid low-$700,000s, and couldn’t live with $1,300,000 – they had to have an extra $39,000, or the deal was off.

My buyers stuck to their guns, and instead we were off to a new listing that was priced well under this one.

Get Good Help!

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Posted by on Jan 16, 2017 in Bidding Wars, Jim's Take on the Market, Market Buzz, Thinking of Buying?, Thinking of Selling?, Why You Should Hire Jim as your Buyer's Agent, Why You Should List With Jim | 2 comments

Selling Early in the Season

The N.A.R. economist/cheerleader gives his reasons on why sellers should list early this year.  Like Yunnie, I don’t think Smoke consults with realtors, instead he just shoots from the hip.  It’s not a bad thing, but it leads to lightweight, obvious answers – see article here:

http://www.realtor.com/news/trends/sellers-in-2017-may-benefit-from-listing-early/

I’ll add my reasons why sellers should get started earlier:

  1.  With few other choices and with the school schedule allowing some latitude on timing, buyers have been tolerant about sellers renting back the house.  Selling earlier and renting back the house enables sellers to bank their equity and make non-contingent offers on their replacement home.
  2.  Motivated buyers have been anxious for months to see the selling season arrive – and those are the buyers you want!
  3.  Some day we could see a surge of boomers looking to cash out of their lightly-maintained, long-time residences. With loads of equity, they (or their heirs) could undercut you on price for a quick sale.
  4.  Historically, demand has been known to turn on a dime.  Currently there is little evidence of that, but if the season gets off to a slow start, the psychological ‘animal spirits’ could recede quickly – especially on price.
  5.  San Diego weather allows buyers to hit the street earlier.
  6.  Trump!

The best time to sell?  When no one else is!

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Posted by on Jan 14, 2017 in Jim's Take on the Market, Thinking of Selling?, Why You Should List With Jim | 0 comments