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Category Archive: ‘Mortgage News’

HELOC vs. Equity Sharing

We’ve been talking about the re-emergence of creative financing – the first was crowdfunding, now this from the latimes.com – an excerpt:

One company based in San Diego, EquityKey, says it has completed or has in process appreciation-sharing agreements on homes with an aggregate value of $200 million already this year, and expects to hit $1 billion by the end of the year. Another, FirstREX in San Francisco, says it has completed hundreds of “equity financing” deals tied to future appreciation.

Though the contractual details and payout amounts differ from company to company, here’s the basic concept: Say you have a house that’s valued at $500,000. If you agree to share 45% of future appreciation on the property and you otherwise qualify in terms of your financial ability to handle property taxes and upkeep, EquityKey might give you $51,750 today to help pay for kids’ tuitions. If you wanted to share 40%, it would give you $47,500. When you end the agreement, you’d have to give EquityKey its portion of the appreciation on the house plus its initial investment.

EquityKey ties its appreciation calculations to the Standard & Poor’s Case-Shiller Home Price Index, which measures home prices in markets across the country. FirstREX uses appraisals upfront and at the end.

Say the house appreciated over the next 10 years by $120,000 and you needed to sell. You’d owe EquityKey the original payout amount — $47,500 or $51,750 — plus its appreciation share at 40% ($48,000) or 45% ($54,000). EquityKey’s cut after 10 years: $95,500 or $105,750 depending on the share you agreed on.

Read full article here:

http://www.latimes.com/business/realestate/la-fi-harney-20150405-story.html

Posted by on Apr 12, 2015 in Mortgage News | 10 comments

Free Cheese for Principal Reductions

ed

Remember when principal reductions were resisted by banks and DeMarco? Now they are throwing money at people:

http://keepyourhomecalifornia.org/press-releases/keep-your-home-california-expands-criteria-of-programs-to-help-homeowners-attain-affordable-mortgage-payments/

SACRAMENTO – Keep Your Home California announced today changes to help more low and moderate income homeowners, who are struggling with their monthly mortgage payments, remain in their homes as part of the free mortgage-assistance program.

The changes will assist homeowners who have suffered a financial hardship attain an affordable monthly mortgage payment and provide them with an opportunity to solve their mortgage troubles, before they fall behind on their payments.

For homeowners who have already fallen behind on their monthly payments, Keep Your Home California more than doubled the amount of funding that is available to help homeowners catch-up on past due mortgages. The state program, which is overseen by the California Housing Finance Agency (CalHFA), can provide up to $100,000 in assistance to eligible homeowners.

“Despite an improving economy and job market, there are still many homeowners who are struggling every month or just need a little help to get back on track with their payments,” said Tia Boatman Patterson, Executive Director of CalHFA. “Our goal is to help California homeowners prevent avoidable foreclosures, and the changes to the program are the latest in that effort.”

The program criteria changes affect the Principal Reduction Program, which allows homeowners with unaffordable monthly mortgage payments to apply for as much as $100,000 in assistance to reduce the principal balance. Principal reductions often lead to savings of hundreds of dollars each month on homeowners’ mortgage payments.

Posted by on Apr 9, 2015 in Jim's Take on the Market, Mortgage News, Principal Reductions | 6 comments

Fannie’s 20-Day First Look

fannie

Fannie Mae has been over-pricing their REOs by at least 10% since 2012, and have been getting away with it because buyers think that because it’s a foreclosure, they are getting a deal, and because Fannie provided ‘HomePath’ financing where no appraisal was required.

They instituted a seven-day First Look Program, where only the owner-occupying buyers were allowed to purchase, which helped to whip up the excitement in unsuspecting buyers, many of whom were purchasing their first home.

But in October, 2014, the HomePath financing was terminated, and apparently the REO portfolio needs to be goosed again.

Here the ‘new’ 20-day First Look Program is rolled out by our N.A.R. goons, and presented as a great new idea to help buyers and preserve neighborhoods.  But in reality, it’s extending the period that Fannie can take advantage of unsuspecting buyers:

Posted by on Apr 3, 2015 in Ethics, Jim's Take on the Market, Market Conditions, Mortgage News, No-Foreclosure as Banking Policy | 0 comments

Best Mortgage?

best loan

Hat tip to both daytrip and just some guy for sending in this article from the latimes.com:

http://www.latimes.com/business/realestate/la-fi-equity-building-mortgage-20150103-story.html#page=1

All with no down payment, no closing costs and no mortgage insurance. The Ongs’ real estate agent, Jill Medley, called it “the best loan in the history of real estate.”

The key feature of the so-called wealth-building home loan is a sharply reduced interest rate on a 15-year term. Instead of requiring a down payment, banks allow borrowers to use their money to pay interest upfront, often called “buying down” the rate.

For their $400,000 house, the Ongs used what would have been a 4% down payment — $16,000 — to instead buy down their rate to 0.5%. In little more than three years of monthly payments, the couple will have more than 20% equity in the home, assuming the property value stays the same.

That more than doubles the equity they would build with the same amount down on a 30-year Federal Housing Administration loan at the going rate of 3.25%.

The Ongs pay only about $150 more each month than they would have paid under the longer-term loan, which would include a hefty mortgage insurance payment.

These are NACA deals, which are capped at a $400,000 purchase price.  Down payments are required but they come from grants, which is how they get around having to pay the PMI.

Buyers also have to live where they can find a house for $400,000 or under, and select a house that nobody else wants – because if there are multiple offers, these 100% financed deals that rely on multiple grants for the down payment will be the last deal chosen by the listing agent.

Buying down the interest rate is a great idea for buyers who are confident they will be in the home for years.  But the benefits diminish quickly for those buying higher than $400,000.

Here is a comparison:

$800,000 purchase price

$160,000 down payment

$640,000 loan amount

15-year loan with 2.0% rate (buydown would probably cost $15,000?)

$4,118.46 per month for 180 months.

30-year loan at today’s 3.75% jumbo rate:

$2,963.94 per month for 360 months.

Paying the loan off in 15 years saves you around $300,000 in interest, which is good.  But if you can live with a monthly payment of $4,118 per month, have an extra $65,000 for additional down payment and opt for a 30-year loan, you can buy a house for $1,125,000 and have the same payment as the $800,000 house.

Unfortunately $800,000 doesn’t buy you much around here any more, and if buyers happen to wonder into a house listed for $1,125,000, they may decide to forget the imposed monthly discipline of a 15-year loan, and instead pay down the loan voluntarily as time goes on.

Posted by on Jan 4, 2015 in Jim's Take on the Market, Mortgage News, Mortgage Qualifying | 3 comments

97% Down Payments

There’s been a lot of hullabaloo about the Fannie/Freddie decision to drop the minimum down payment from 5% to 3%.

But the 2% difference will have virtually nothing to do with the decision to default. If a homeowner is going to walk from a 3% down payment; they will walk from a 5% down payment too.

Shiller speaks in his usual ‘casual indifference’ here, but they didn’t cut his last point in the video – that historically the ‘slowing of appreciation has sometimes been the precursor to declines':

According to recent data from the National Association of Realtors, first-time homebuyers account for just 33 percent of all home purchases. That’s the lowest level in 27 years.

“Maybe there’s a cultural change. Our millennials spend more time on Facebook than standing over the backyard fence and talking to the neighbor,” Shiller said, attempting to explain the drop in new homebuyers.

  “Maybe neighborhoods are not as important. Or maybe there’s an urbanization trend going on.”

Posted by on Dec 15, 2014 in Down Payments, Mortgage News | 6 comments

Appraisal Issues

appraisal

Hat tip to Susie for sending in this article on appraisals:

http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/personalfinance/2014/12/06/appraisal-real-estate/19906355/

An excerpt:

This past July Janice Charlton of Thousand Oaks, Calif., says she was low-balled on a refinance appraisal with the value coming in at $745,000. “I was completely shocked. I follow the real estate market,” said Charlton.

She appealed the value through the lender with the AMC that hired the appraiser, to no avail. “It’s arbitrary. It’s a real conflict-of-interest,”  she added.

Charlton did not give up. She applied elsewhere. Less than a month later another appraiser through a different lender brought the value in at $860,000. Charlton’s perseverance paid off. She completed her refinance, saving $1,397 per month with her new, lower house payment.

Unfortunately for the loan rep, this borrower did the only thing she could to obtain her refinance – go to another bank.

Low appraisals are not as common on purchases because the appraiser is given the sales price and told to hit it.  But I never take it for granted – I meet every appraiser on time, and bring several comps to justify the price.  It’s a sales job – realtors who send one of their assistants or just tells the appraiser to use the lockbox are asking for trouble.  Get Good Help!

Posted by on Dec 7, 2014 in Mortgage News | 2 comments

More Free Cheese

max cheese

More foreclosure-avoidance incentives were announced this week:

http://www.mortgagenewsdaily.com/12052014_hamp_mfa_programs.asp

An excerpt:

“While the housing sector has strengthened in recent years, there are still many homeowners struggling to make their mortgage payments,” said Secretary of the Treasury Jacob J. Lew. “The changes we are announcing today offer meaningful incentives for borrowers to stay current in their modifications, increase their opportunity to build equity in their homes, and provide vital safety nets for those facing greater financial strains.”

The Home Affordable Modification Program (HAMP), established in 2009, offers homeowners loan modifications with lower monthly payments achieved through lowered interest rates and modified loan terms.  Many homeowners with HAMP modifications have been eligible to earn up to $5,000 if they adhere to modification terms for five years.  The amount is applied to their outstanding principal balance.

Under the revisions an additional $5,000 will be available to homeowners after a sixth year of on-time payments and they will then have the opportunity to re-amortize the reduced mortgage balance, thus further lowering their monthly payment.   HUD/Treasury estimate some one million borrowers with HAMP modifications may be eligible for the new incentive.

HAMP Tier 2 was developed as an alternative for homeowners who can’t qualify or are unable to sustain a HAMP Tier 1 modifications.  It provides modifications with a low fixed rate for the life of the loan.  The revision announced this week will include reducing the interest rate for these modified loans by 50 basis points which will also make more borrowers eligible for the program.  It also extends the sixth year $5,000 pay-for-performance incentive to Tier Two borrowers.

Posted by on Dec 6, 2014 in Bailout, Loan Mods, Mortgage News | 8 comments

Underwriting Guidelines

Rob Dawg brought up how discriminatory the underwriting guideline is for those who use interest/dividend income to qualify – they have to prove that the income will extend three years into the future.  Yet those homebuyers on salary or hourly pay don’t have to make any such assertion, and they could get fired the next day after closing.

There are other underwriting guidelines that make you scratch your head too.  Here are some examples:

1. ‘Gift’ for down payment – The previous standard was that as long as your down payment was at least 20% of the purchase price, the entire amount could be a gift.  But now the Fannie/Freddie automated underwriting is allowing 10% down payments to be all-gift too.  Is that really ‘skin in the game’?  Sellers can still pay all buyer closing costs too.

2. Reserves – If you are buying a rental property, you have to use at least a 20% down payment (25% on 2-4 units), AND have at least six months’ worth of payments in the bank at closing – which includes your PITI payments on current residence and the new rental property.  It makes sense too – you could get hit with a quick vacancy, and the bank would want you to have ample reserves.

However, when buying a residence as an owner-occupier, the required reserves are much less.  The guideline states that the buyer should have two months’ worth of payments in the bank – which isn’t much – and a lender told me he has been closing FHA/VA loans recently with less than one payment’s worth of dough left in the bank!

3.  Appraisals - With the new rules that isolate appraisers from influencing agents, you’d think the inflated-appraisal problem would be solved.  But they still give appraisers the actual sales price and tell them to hit it, which takes out some of the objectivity.  Even so, today’s article (LINKhat tip T&W) included this quote, “If you thought what was happening before was an embarrassment, wait until the second time around”.

Think of these questionable guidelines when you hear how the ‘tight credit’ is mucking up the market!

Posted by on Dec 2, 2014 in Jim's Take on the Market, Mortgage News, Mortgage Qualifying | 5 comments

EZ-Doc

From the wsj.com:

A new mortgage lender is loosening documentation requirements, allowing applicants to provide less paperwork on income and assets than is typical to get a home loan.

Social Finance, a peer-to-peer lender often referred to as SoFi, rolled out mortgage lending in five states—New Jersey, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Texas and Washington—and the District of Columbia on Tuesday. The San Francisco-based lender began offering mortgages in California in August.

The firm has specialized in student loans since it launched in 2011. The move into mortgages comes as SoFi prepares to file to raise $200 million to $250 million in an initial public offering early next year, according to its chief executive Mike Cagney.

SoFi’s mortgages will be geared toward borrowers with high credit scores, though other criteria will be less onerous than what most other lenders require. The firm isn’t requiring tax returns to verify applicants’ income or proof of funds to verify the source of borrowers’ down payments—requirements that most lenders have had in place since the housing downturn. Instead, SoFi is accepting applicants’ most recent paystub or W2 as proof of income. It will also take all applicants at their word that their down-payment funds aren’t coming from a loan they have taken out elsewhere, says Mr. Cagney. Borrowers will have to make a minimum 10% down payment.

Read the full article here:

http://blogs.wsj.com/totalreturn/2014/10/07/new-mortgage-lender-demands-less-documentation/

mortgage rates Oct 10 2014

Posted by on Oct 10, 2014 in Mortgage News, Mortgage Qualifying | 8 comments