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Winstanley In Escrow

Our reader elbarcosr agreed that it’s easy to get page views with everyone sitting at home on the computer anyway these days. Here are today’s counts of our Winstanley listing:

Zillow: 1,755

YouTube: 1,326

Facebook ad: 1,451

The Facebook ad was responsible for 840 of the YouTube views, which means the MLS and the blog accounted for 486 views.  The blog views have been running around 100 per video, so almost 400 views of the video tour came from potential buyers who saw it in the MLS remarks or on one of the search portals.

It makes you think potential buyers don’t mind previewing a home by video!

We had about 15 showings in person, and three written offers.

The three original bathrooms were enough for most buyers to pass altogether in a very conservative environment these days.  I think I could have sold it 3-4 times if the house was completely turnkey. But you can only sell it once, so balancing the investment vs return is a critical step.

These results are about what I was expecting before the covid-19.

Mostly-renovated houses in desirable neighborhoods on the lower-end of the range are still going to attract significant interest.  Play your cards right, and you can still sell in the first five days on the market.

Get Good Help!

 

Winstanley Report

This has to be the most Zillow views we’ve had on a listing during the first day on the market.

Between the two copies of the video tour (one is non-branded), there have been 159 views.

The house has been shown four times in person.  Housing is essential for some.

Everyone is a looker though. Are people willing to buy? It is a humble environment now.

Selling Your House During Coronavirus


I’ve been convinced for years that we can sell homes by video, and the coronavirus will present that challenge to us now. If agents can be handy with their phone, a decent representation can be made that should be enough to get buyers to make offers – and we’ll figure out the rest:


https://www.compass.com/listing/13689-winstanley-way-san-diego-ca-92130/482638905699812401/







Median Sales Prices by Area

It’s been ten years since the bottom of the market.

Let’s see how the annual median-sales-prices of detached-homes have changed:

Town or Area
Zip Code
2009
2014
2019
10yr % chg
Cardiff
92007
$785,000
$1,180,000
$1,408,000
+79%
NW Carlsbad
92008
$587,000
$740,000
$999,500
+70%
SE Carlsbad
92009
$690,000
$825,000
$1,085,000
+56%
NE Carlsbad
92010
$528,750
$650,000
$830,000
+57%
SW Carlsbad
92011
$696,500
$850,000
$1,113,050
+60%
Carmel Valley
92130
$855,000
$1,090,000
$1,345,000
+57%
Del Mar
92014
$1,350,000
$1,625,000
$2,000,000
+48%
Encinitas
92024
$720,000
$955,000
$1,409,000
+96%
La Jolla
92037
$1,450,000
$1,640,000
$2,100,000
+45%
RSF
92067
$2,325,000
$2,476,596
$2,550,000
+10%
Solana Beach
92075
$1,075,000
$1,326,000
$1,462,500
+36%
NSDCC MSP
All Above
$815,000
$1,013,000
$1,325,000
+63%
NSDCC Sales
All Above
2,204
2,813
2,801
+27%

Takeaways?

  1. Everywhere’s a million!
  2. Most areas had their median sales price rise more in the second half (2014-2019).
  3. The number of sales is very impressive, given the run-up in pricing (we had 2,781 sales in 2018).
  4. Pricing in the Ranch has averaged +1% per year, which proves we can live with flat pricing for 5-10 years.
  5. Encinitas is less like Carlsbad and more like its ritzy neighbors to the south. Maybe it’s the culture?

https://encinitasca.gov/Home/City-Calendar/ctl/ViewEvent/mid/774/OccuranceId/3336

Carmel Valley/PHR Update

What will it be like when there are no more new homes to buy in Carmel Valley?  Pardee has been building houses steadily for 30+ years, and they will be down to their last 103 lots, once they are done here – and they’ve sold 33 of 44 so far. These are priced from $1.8 to $2.5M.

Toll hopes to sell two per month at Palomar (the image above), and they sold five in October!  Altogether they’ve sold 36, which puts them ahead of schedule. They are priced from $2.5 to $3.8M.

Carmel Valley REO Closed

We featured this bank-owned property earlier as an online auction (which didn’t work out).

They did find a cash buyer – I hope they got in the house to take a look around!

This is a typical example of an REO sale these days.  The former owners paid $1,650,000 in 2007, and used a 31% down payment.  The original $1,137,500 mortgage was funded by World Savings, and undoubtedly it was a neg-am loan.

It looks like the buyers stopped paying in 2010, but instead of foreclosing and losing a truckload, the bank (Wells Fargo, who bought World Savings) just waited until they knew market value was high enough that they wouldn’t lose money:

The price at the trustee’s sale in November was $1,365,016, and they sold it traditionally for $1,350,000.  It means that after paying closing costs, the bank received 100% of the principal back, plus around $150,000 of the neg-am interest that accrued.

These days, banks are only foreclosing once they can make money on them!

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