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An Insider's Guide to North San Diego County's Coastal Real Estate
Jim Klinge, broker-associate
858-997-3801
klingerealty@gmail.com
Compass
617 Saxony Place, Suite 101
Encinitas, CA 92024
Klinge Realty
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Are you looking for an experienced agent to help you buy or sell a home? Contact Jim the Realtor!

Jim Klinge
Cell/Text: (858) 997-3801
klingerealty@gmail.com
701 Palomar Airport Road, Suite 300
Carlsbad, CA 92011


Category Archive: ‘Tips, Advice & Links’

Kids’ Influence on Home Buying

When buying a home, the opinion of children matter.  If you also add what the parents think the kids want and need, and include those variables into the home-buying decision, it would be even higher – probably close to 100%.  Centrally-located homes with big yards and pools tend to benefit:

When it comes to purchasing a new home, 55 percent of U.S. homeowners with a child under the age of 18 at the time of home purchase say the opinion of their child was a factor in their home buying decision. This is according to a new Harris Poll survey commissioned by SunTrust Mortgage, a division of SunTrust Banks, Inc. (NYSE: STI). For millennial parents between the ages of 18 and 36, the influence of children is even higher at 74 percent.

What are children lobbying for in a home? Top requests include their own bedrooms (57 percent); large backyards (34 percent); proximity to parks/activities (25 percent), schools (24 percent), friends (24 percent); and swimming pools (21 percent).

“As a parent of two kids, I know from experience that including children in the home buying process is not only fun for the whole family, but also educational for our homebuyers of tomorrow,” said Todd Chamberlain, head of Mortgage Banking at SunTrust.

Link to Article

Posted by on Jun 13, 2018 in Jim's Take on the Market, Market Conditions, Tips, Advice & Links | 1 comment

Lowball Offers

It is virtually impossible for lowball offers to succeed in the first week or two – the fresh listings get too many showings in the beginning, and sellers and listing agents are optimistic.  Wait at least a month before attempting a lower offer, and don’t be surprised if you get kicked to the curb.

From realtor.com:

Real estate pros warn against extremely lowball offers (typically more than 15% below listing price) because you might offend the sellers—even if the home’s been on the market for months. Strategize with your agent to determine both how far under listing price you’re comfortable going, and what you think the sellers might respond to.

Not sure where to start? These five signs will help you determine when the time is right for a low offer.

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Posted by on May 31, 2018 in Jim's Take on the Market, Tips, Advice & Links | 2 comments

Buy a House With An X?

This is why electronic signatures are binding. Thanks daytrip!

Does it matter what you sign on contracts? Could you draw a picture or put an X and have it still be legally binding?

With so many facets of modern life being automated, signatures being easy to forge, and given how difficult it is to prove based on signature alone whether a given person actually signed something, using a person’s exact signature “design” for verification purposes after the fact is going the way of the Dodo.

This leads us to the question of the day – given all this, is there any rule about what exactly your signature has to look like? Can you, for example, just sign all your legal documents with a big X like they do in cartoons?

As it turns out, just like it’s possible to cash those big novelty checks because there’s no rule about what a check has to look like or be made of (just what information needs to be included), you can, in many regions of the world, sign a document in any way you wish. This is because a signature from a legal standpoint is just proof that you considered and accepted something. Or to quote the U.S.’ Uniform Commercial Code  §3-401(b):

A signature may be made (i) manually or by means of a device or machine, and (ii) by the use of any name, including a trade or assumed name, or by a word, mark, or symbol executed or adopted by a person with present intention to authenticate a writing.

In other words, even if you sign a document in the U.S. and many other parts of the world with a drawing, you’re still legally bound by the terms of that document because it’s the act of signing a document that matters, not the signature itself.

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Posted by on May 1, 2018 in Jim's Take on the Market, Tips, Advice & Links | 2 comments

More on Home Staging

From Realtor Magazine:

Real estate shopping requires a buyer’s imagination. As a real estate professional, you want open-house guests to be able to picture the household as if they’ve already moved into the property. That’s why staging can make all the difference in the world, especially for an empty house, says Desare Kohn-Laski, broker-owner of Skye Louis Realty in Coconut Creek, Fla.

If you’re having a tough time convincing sellers that staging a vacant home is worth it, here are four compelling reasons that Kohn-Laski shares with her clients.

  1. Staging plants the idea that a home could be theirs. Buyers will make a good offer at first sight if the mood of a property says, “This could be your next home.” Whether it’s a townhome, condo, or single-family property, Kohn-Laski says it’s worth it to present a home in the best, most inviting light possible.
  2. Staging puts room dimensions into perspective. This point is important for both listing photos and for showings. “Without anything in it, a buyer will be clueless in differentiating the size of a room even if you give its area measurement,” Kohn-Laski says. “But with some furnishings in it, there will be reference points to at least give them an estimate that this room is actually larger than the other one.”
  3. Staging emphasizes the positive aspects of a home. Imperfections in walls, floor bumps, missing details in built-in cabinets, and small closets tend to get more attention when there’s nothing else to look at in a vacant home. It’s tougher for buyers to imagine the view from the couch, the dinners at the dining room table, or the cookouts on the back deck.
  4. Staging curbs negative presumptions. According to seller’s agents, Kohn-Laski says, an empty house typically gives an idea of financial crisis, divorce, and personal problems. Staging dissuades negative assumptions about the sellers, she adds.
Link to Article Bob Vila 10 Staging Tips

My thoughts:

Staging a home with attractive furniture and artwork helps buyers envision the possibilities, and give a boost to the online photos, which stimulates more interest.  It’s one of the best things to ever happen to home sales:

  1. Staging enables resale homes to imitate the model-home look.
  2. For buyers who wanted new, a staged resale home might be close enough.
  3. A staged home compares more favorably to a non-staged home, and can compete with new homes.
  4. HGTV shows have trained buyers to expect staging.

For those who want to ensure a good first impression, staging is an ideal option.

Posted by on Apr 26, 2018 in Jim's Take on the Market, Staging, Tips, Advice & Links, Why You Should List With Jim | 1 comment