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Are you looking for an experienced agent to help you buy or sell a home? Contact Jim the Realtor!

Jim Klinge
Cell/Text: (858) 997-3801
klingerealty@gmail.com
701 Palomar Airport Road, Suite 300
Carlsbad, CA 92011


Category Archive: ‘Staging’

More on Home Staging

From Realtor Magazine:

Real estate shopping requires a buyer’s imagination. As a real estate professional, you want open-house guests to be able to picture the household as if they’ve already moved into the property. That’s why staging can make all the difference in the world, especially for an empty house, says Desare Kohn-Laski, broker-owner of Skye Louis Realty in Coconut Creek, Fla.

If you’re having a tough time convincing sellers that staging a vacant home is worth it, here are four compelling reasons that Kohn-Laski shares with her clients.

  1. Staging plants the idea that a home could be theirs. Buyers will make a good offer at first sight if the mood of a property says, “This could be your next home.” Whether it’s a townhome, condo, or single-family property, Kohn-Laski says it’s worth it to present a home in the best, most inviting light possible.
  2. Staging puts room dimensions into perspective. This point is important for both listing photos and for showings. “Without anything in it, a buyer will be clueless in differentiating the size of a room even if you give its area measurement,” Kohn-Laski says. “But with some furnishings in it, there will be reference points to at least give them an estimate that this room is actually larger than the other one.”
  3. Staging emphasizes the positive aspects of a home. Imperfections in walls, floor bumps, missing details in built-in cabinets, and small closets tend to get more attention when there’s nothing else to look at in a vacant home. It’s tougher for buyers to imagine the view from the couch, the dinners at the dining room table, or the cookouts on the back deck.
  4. Staging curbs negative presumptions. According to seller’s agents, Kohn-Laski says, an empty house typically gives an idea of financial crisis, divorce, and personal problems. Staging dissuades negative assumptions about the sellers, she adds.
Link to Article Bob Vila 10 Staging Tips

My thoughts:

Staging a home with attractive furniture and artwork helps buyers envision the possibilities, and give a boost to the online photos, which stimulates more interest.  It’s one of the best things to ever happen to home sales:

  1. Staging enables resale homes to imitate the model-home look.
  2. For buyers who wanted new, a staged resale home might be close enough.
  3. A staged home compares more favorably to a non-staged home, and can compete with new homes.
  4. HGTV shows have trained buyers to expect staging.

For those who want to ensure a good first impression, staging is an ideal option.

Posted by on Apr 26, 2018 in Jim's Take on the Market, Staging, Tips, Advice & Links, Why You Should List With Jim | 1 comment

Bathroom Tips

From realtor.com:

It may not be the grandest room in the house, but the bathroom is one of the most important when it comes to selling your home. Buyers want as many bathrooms as they can afford, and they want them pristine. So, if you’re getting set to host an open house, it’s time to spiff yours up! Here’s exactly what you need to do to get it ready:

Clean everything. You know this already: There’s nothing worse than walking into an open house and finding mildew, scum, hair (or worse) in and around the tub, toilet, and sink. Give your bathroom the kind of deep cleaning you’d usually reserve for when the in-laws visit. Ask yourself, “What would Martha Stewart think?” No rings around the tub, no soap scum on the shower door, no beard clippings in the sink. Use a mix of vinegar and water in a spray bottle to make mirrors sparkle—it’s an old-school recipe that gets fabulous results (just remember to wipe away streaks with either newspaper or a microfiber towel).

Hide your toiletries. That means toothbrushes, contact lens kits, loose makeup containers, hairspray bottles—anything that could clutter up your countertop goes into the medicine cabinet, under the sink, or wherever it won’t be seen.

Then put out nicer ones. Now is the time to break out those triple-milled imported soaps, or a nice handsoap and lotion duo. Think hotel bathroom.

Remove prescription drugs. We can’t stress this one enough. If you have a medicine cabinet full of allergy meds, sleeping pills, or anything else your doctor may have prescribed, either lock it in a safe or take it with you when you leave during the open house.

Read More

Posted by on Mar 23, 2018 in Jim's Take on the Market, Staging, Tips, Advice & Links, Why You Should List With Jim | 0 comments

14 Staging Tips for Smaller Homes

These days it seems like everybody wants a tiny house. But what if your home isn’t adorably tiny? What if it’s just sadly small?

Don’t worry—it’s not your square footage that matters most; it’s how you present it. Even if you’re tight on space, you can fool buyers into thinking things are bigger than they appear—you just have to have some smart tricks up your sleeve. Keep reading for our experts’ savviest and sneakiest tips for seeing big returns on the petite place you currently call home.

1. Throw a reverse housewarming party

The less clutter, the bigger your home will look and feel to potential buyers. To get rid of your unwanted items, throw a party before your first open house, suggests Laura McHolm, co-founder of NorthStar Moving.

“Instead of having your friends bring a gift, have them pick one of your items and take it home with them.”

2. Go down to the bare minimum

Still feel like your home is full of stuff?

“Box up everything you don’t need on a daily basis and anything that’s smaller than a football,” suggests home staging expert Lori Matzke.

Sift through your glass cupboards and built-ins, and clean off your countertops.

“Leaving just the bare minimum will create the feeling of more space,” she says.

That goes for your beloved tchotchkes, too.

“A smaller space tends to favor a more minimalist design, so having all of your collectible figurines on display on the shelves, side and console tables will bring the room in rather than opening it up,” says Bee Heinemann, marketing director and interior decorating expert at Vänt Wall Panels.

3. Take your doors off their hinges

Remove all your interior doors, besides those that lead to bedrooms, bathrooms, and closets, suggests G. Brian Davis, director of education for SparkRental. “The farther the eye can see, the better.”

Read More

Posted by on Sep 11, 2017 in Jim's Take on the Market, Staging, Thinking of Selling?, Tips, Advice & Links, Why You Should List With Jim | 1 comment

Getting Your House Ready to Sell

Great tips on improving your house to sell:

1. Boost curb appeal. This is something you always hear, and with very good reason. Many people thinking of touring your home will do a quick drive-by first, often deciding on the spot if it is even worth a look inside. Make sure your home is ready to lure in onlookers with these tips:

  • Power wash siding and walkways
  • Hang easy-to-read house numbers
  • Plant blooming flowers and fresh greenery
  • Mow lawn, and reseed or add fresh sod as needed
  • Wash front windows
  • Repaint or stain the porch floor as needed

Read full article here:

http://www.foxnews.com/leisure/2012/07/29/21-staging-tips-for-selling-your-home-fast/

Posted by on Jan 3, 2017 in Jim's Take on the Market, Staging, Tips, Advice & Links | 5 comments

Granite-Slab Yards

2016-10-07-12-50-44

Granite-slab yards we considered – all around Miramar Rd. All are good:

Amazon Stones

Rainbow

Picasso

Arizona Tile

Tosca

We were looking for max efficiency, and after I previewed all five, we hit four yards in two trips – which for the homeowners turned into a brief 2.5-hour investment on how to spend smart money to sell your house for top dollar.

Keep going until you find something you like!

Posted by on Oct 7, 2016 in Jim's Take on the Market, Listing Agent Practices, Remodel Projects, Staging, Why You Should List With Jim | 3 comments