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An Insider's Guide to North San Diego County's Coastal Real Estate
Jim Klinge, broker-associate
858-997-3801
klingerealty@gmail.com
Compass
617 Saxony Place, Suite 101
Encinitas, CA 92024
Klinge Realty
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Are you looking for an experienced agent to help you buy or sell a home? Contact Jim the Realtor!

Jim Klinge
Cell/Text: (858) 997-3801
klingerealty@gmail.com
701 Palomar Airport Road, Suite 300
Carlsbad, CA 92011


Category Archive: ‘Realtor’

Price Reductions Already

The percentages are quite a bit higher this year. The title of the graph could be ‘Sellers Who Are Having No Showings’ because most are (overly) optimistic this early in the selling season and hold tight on price until later.  Something must be rattling them – like no showings.

An excerpt from the UT article:

Home price reductions are still common when the market is red hot. It is sometimes a selling tactic — although not usually considered a good one — to price a home higher and then come down so the buyer feels like they are getting a deal. But, the number of reductions recently shows a big change.

For instance, 8.5 percent of homes had price reductions in November 2016. In November 2018, there were 29.4 percent.

Jason Cassity, a real estate agent based downtown, said the industry has a problem shifting when there has been a big change — such as a downturn in sales at the end of last year. He said some agents are operating like there will still be a bidding war.

“If you continue pricing like it is 2016, it is going to sit on the market a long time,” he said. “Or you are going to be one of those 20 percent (in February) that have to price reduce.”

He said a lot of the reductions he has seen were listings marked up too high out of the gate, something a lot of agents could get away with for years. He said sometimes homes are priced overly high just to meet sellers’ expectation of a huge payday, not the actual value.

Cassity said he presents news articles about the real estate market to clients before they decide on what price they are going to market with.

Link to Full Article

Posted by on Mar 15, 2019 in Jim's Take on the Market, Listing Agent Practices, Market Conditions, Realtor, Realtors Talking Shop, Thinking of Buying?, Thinking of Selling? | 1 comment

Real Estate Class Action Lawsuit

While we’re on how NAR and others have failed us, let’s mention the latest class-action lawsuit:

Link to Notorious Rob article Link to HW

Buyer-agents are heralding this as the Big Turning Point is real estate because the lawsuit aims to ‘break up the cartel’ and unbundle real estate commissions.

There is a whole legion of agents that offer a fee-for-service menu who think they are doing the consumer a favor. But it is a great dis-service to tempt consumers to select their agent based on their fee.  This is where NAR and others have failed us miserably because nobody talks about how important it is for consumers to identify the skill level of agents they are considering.

Agents offer a discounted commission/rebate/fee-for-service because they don’t have the skill level to earn a higher fee.  In effect, they ‘buy the business’ with lower cost/less service, and the consumer gets what they pay for.

But if this lawsuit prevails, causing MLS companies to be run out of business and ‘broker cooperation’ to get dismantled (seller paying the buyer-agent fee), the buyer agents will be the first casualty.

On this blog we talk about street-level impact.

Here’s an example that happened to Kayla in Manhattan, where the rental market is so hot that tenants have to pay their broker directly – and the typical fee is two months of rent.

Kayla is showing rentals to her old college roommate plus one other woman.  The listing agent is present, and when Kayla goes into a bedroom with one of the women, the listing broker pulls the other aside and says, ‘if you don’t want to pay Kayla’s fee, just go through me directly’.

The two women rented the apartment directly through the listing agent, and burned Kayla.

We’re sliding into single agency, where buyers/tenants will just go directly to the listing agent.  They will never know if they saved any money, they won’t know if they got proper representation (unlikely), and they will just take what they get.

The reason disintermediation worked in the travel business because consumers don’t worry about a bad vacation costing them an additional five- or six-figures in resale costs (and major disruption of life) to unwind one.

Without constant reminders of how important it is to Get Good Help, buyers will be left to their own devices and just go directly to the guy who has the product – the listing agent.

Single agency is not what’s best for consumers or agents – yet the market forces are heading in that direction without recognizing the ramifications.  Watch what you wish for!

Obviously, my rantings on this topic have done nothing to slow down the trend, so joining Compass was the best way to position myself for my clients.

Posted by on Mar 13, 2019 in Compass, Jim's Take on the Market, Realtor, Scams, The Future | 0 comments

Compass Search Portal

The real estate industry has never felt the need to create a powerful search portal in response to Zillow.  There should have been an industry-wide effort to create a realtor-centric website to support our business, but NAR and others just shrugged it off.

Traditional realtors should be demonstrating why our experience, our advice, and our gravitas is a better solution for consumers.

It starts with realtors having the best real estate search portal – and Compass has committed to producing it!  Our website will make it clear who the actual listing agent is on each listing, regardless of company.

There is another benefit – we put our Coming Soon listings in the front of the search, which will hopefully cause consumers to keep coming back, and help build the traffic faster.

From our CEO:

The future of the real estate industry will be defined by the company that creates the best experience for buying and selling a home. I believe Compass is going to be that company. To achieve our mission of helping everyone find their place in the world, we must make it as simple and straightforward as possible for people to navigate the process of buying and selling a home. We must also put the person who knows how to create a world-class customer experience front and center: the agent.

Many technology companies are doing the exact opposite. They’re confusing consumers and taking advantage of agents in order to maximize their own profits. They most commonly do this by hiding the true listing agent and monetizing the client lead in a variety of ways.

At Compass, we are not just looking to elevate ourselves, we are looking to elevate the industry. Being the first company to show the true listing agent on every listing will not only help bring clarity to the home-buying process, but it is the right thing to do.

It is part of a 3-step strategy to win the consumer:

  1. Make the Compass website and mobile app just as good as the best aggregators by end of summer 2019
  2. Invest millions of dollars advertising our Coming Soon inventory to consumers around the country
  3. Put the listing agent on every listing, making Compass.com the only site in the country where consumers can always find the listing agent

It means we are gently nudging consumers towards connecting with the listing agents directly, making that trend more obvious to all.  If the business is going that way anyway, we might as well be out in front of it. JtR

https://www.compass.com/

Posted by on Mar 12, 2019 in Coming Soon, Compass, Jim's Take on the Market, Realtor, The Future | 2 comments

Coming Tomorrow

One of the problems with Coming Soon is the vague timing.  It’s is more like Coming Soon/Some Day/Maybe/Who Knows.

It’s frustrating for buyers because they’ve been trained to want to see the hot new listings immediately before somebody else beats them to it.

Can we at least put a date on it?

My new listing in Old Carlsbad with this view and priced at $1.6 million will be on the MLS tomorrow, with open house 12-3pm on Saturday.  I’ll have more information and photos/video later today!

Posted by on Mar 7, 2019 in Coming Soon, Jim's Take on the Market, Listing Agent Practices, Realtor, Why You Should List With Jim | 0 comments

Zillow Strategy

It’s out in the open now – Zillow intends to change the game. An excerpt from an interview with Rich Barton where he admits Zillow used agents to get big, and is now deciding how to use that power:

An excerpt from I-News:

Barton also indicated there could be major changes coming to the way that Zillow deals with agents. Thus far, Zillow has derived profits from charging agents to appear on the site, with the idea being that would-be homebuyers will find those agents and end up working with them.

But that’s changing.

Barton told Stratechery that he wants to move away from a subscription based model and toward “a success-based compensation scheme that is around what happens when consumers actually close a transaction.” That will delay Zillow’s revenue but should whittle down the number or people the company is working with and improve the consumer experience.

“It enables us to move from a system of huge floors of people dialing for dollars for advertisers, which is what’s happening right now, to a group of people where we are actually interviewing and selecting partners we think can do the best job for our collective consumers,” Barton said. “It’s a complete mindset switch in the way we are thinking about things.”

The comment appears to reference Zillow’s Premier Broker Flex Pricing program, which debuted last year.

J.D. Ross, another cofounder at Opendoor, picked up on Barton’s comments and opined that Zillow appears to be acknowledging it will ultimately displace real estate agents.

A Zillow spokesperson noted that Ross’ comment was merely his interpretation and pointed to another part of the interview where Barton discussed the importance of agents for the company’s future business. Barton described Offers as a “fast lane,” but added that most consumers will still choose a more conventional “right-hand lane.”

“So we see both of these lanes as critical because we want to serve everybody, we want to get everybody to a better place,” Barton said, referring to both Offers and the company’s agent-based business.

Posted by on Mar 7, 2019 in Jim's Take on the Market, Realtor, The Future, Zillow | 3 comments

Know the Inventory

Here’s a good example of what makes us old-school agents good at our job – we know the inventory.  Seeing the new listings every week enables us to recognize the features/nuances of each home and how they compare to other active, pending, and sold listings. It also gives us a chance to network with the other agents, get tips, and build alliances – and find good matches for our buyers.

You never see discount or disrupter agents on tour – ever:

Posted by on Feb 28, 2019 in Jim's Take on the Market, Realtor, Realtors Talking Shop | 0 comments

DRE on Coming Soons

The DRE has finally issued ‘guidance’ on the Coming Soons.  Ignored are these facts about agents making off-market deals with no MLS exposure:

  1. We see top agents doing it regularly,
  2. There is no enforcement whatsoever, and
  3. You give us the forms to CYA (last paragraph).

Burying this advice in the back of the bulletin isn’t enough.  Until we see realtors being prosecuted and found guilty, nothing will change.

DRE Weighs In on “Coming Soon” Advertising: “Be Sure to Maintain Fiduciary Responsibility for Your Client or Face Civil and Regulatory Liability”

The Department of Real Estate has included in its 2018 Winter Real Estate Bulletin an article which discusses the risks of “Coming Soon” marketing. It includes a statement of the DRE’s view of “best practices” for listing agents:

“Coming Soon” advertising CAN benefit the seller if handled properly. Such advertising can increase exposure time of the property and generate interest in the public about a soon-to-be marketed property, helping potential purchasers prepare to tour the property or make an offer when the property is put up for sale. A practice of “Coming Soon” advertising coupled with initially not showing the property is sometimes known as a “Coming Soon—No Showing” strategy (or similar) and can well serve a client. In such a strategy, the property may show as “Coming Soon” on a multiple listing service, but also as not yet being shown to potential buyers. After a time, the property is broadly marketed as for sale. There are likely multiple listing service requirements that must be met to advertise a property as “Coming Soon—No Showing” or similar.

The potential conflict a “Coming Soon” strategy can have with a licensee’s fiduciary duty comes when the listing agent begins accepting offers before the property is exposed to a larger audience via a multiple listing service or by other means. When a property is not exposed to the full market, a client’s best interests might not be served, even when a full price offer is received (because the property may well have sold above the marketed price if better advertised). Imagine the dilemma for a listing agent if a seller accepts an offer on a poorly marketed property and then receives much higher backup offers as the property receives greater exposure.

At a minimum, an agent should disclose that a better sales price could be obtained if the property were to be marketed on a multiple listing service and obtain the seller’s prior written permission that she or he agrees to not fully market the property.

A listing agent who encourages the use of a “Coming Soon” program, without broadly advertising a property via a multiple listing service or other means, especially exposes himself/herself to the potential for an increased chance of civil liability and regulatory action when the agent also then represents the buyer in a dual agent capacity. Such a dual agent would need to be able to demonstrate that the agent acted in the best interests of the seller to obtain a purchase price that was as high as could be expected for a fully marketed property. This agent, who receives commissions on both ends of the transaction, could face scrutiny questioning whether they worked to obtain the best offer possible for the seller or was acting in such a capacity for personal financial gain.

The following are some best practices for agents when representing a seller:

• Market the property via multiple listing service or other broad advertising means.
• Make sure the seller agrees to and understands how the property will be marketed.
• If using a “Coming Soon” strategy, do not accept and act on offers until a property has been broadly marketed.
• If the property will not be fully marketed, obtain prior written permission from the seller that demonstrates they understand that such a “Coming Soon” strategy may not result in receiving the best sales price.
• Avoid double-ending a property that is not fully marketed—it is best to refer potential buyers to another agent.

The C.A.R. Residential Listing Agreement explains the benefits to the seller of using the MLS and the impact of opting out.

For the seller to instruct the agent to opt out of the MLS, the seller and broker must initial paragraph 5 of the RLA. Additionally, the seller must sign form SELM (Seller Instruction to Exclude Listing from Multiple Listing Service) or the comparable form provided by the MLS.

Link to Bulletin

Posted by on Feb 28, 2019 in Coming Soon, Ethics, Jim's Take on the Market, Realtor, Realtors Talking Shop | 3 comments