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An Insider's Guide to North San Diego County's Coastal Real Estate
Jim Klinge, broker-associate
858-997-3801
klingerealty@gmail.com
Compass
617 Saxony Place, Suite 101
Encinitas, CA 92024
Klinge Realty
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Are you looking for an experienced agent to help you buy or sell a home? Contact Jim the Realtor!

Jim Klinge
Cell/Text: (858) 997-3801
klingerealty@gmail.com
701 Palomar Airport Road, Suite 300
Carlsbad, CA 92011


Category Archive: ‘Local Flavor’

Defective Nuclear-Waste Storage

Are you looking for one more reason to move away? 

It sounds like if/when the Big One starts shaking, you will need to grab everything you own and move to Yuma.

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) admits in their November 28, 2018 NRC Inspection Report and Notice of Violation, every Holtec canister downloaded into the storage holes is damaged due to inadequate clearance between the canister and the divider shell in the storage hole (vault).  The NRC states canister walls are already “worn”.  This results in cracks. Once cracks start, they continue to grow through the wall.

The NRC stated Southern California Edison (and Holtec) knew about this since January 2018, but continued to load 29 canisters anyway.  Edison’s August 24, 2018 press release states they plan to finish loading mid 2019.

The NRC states Edison must stop loading canisters until this issue is resolved.  However, there is no method to inspect or repair cracking canisters and the NRC knows this.

The NRC should require all San Onofre thin-wall canisters be replaced with thick-wall transportable storage casks.  These are the only proven dry storage systems that can be inspected, maintained, repaired and monitored in a manner to prevent major radiological releases and explosions.

California state agencies should revoke San Onofre permits and withhold Decommissioning Trust Funds until these issues are resolved.

The Navy should consider revoking the San Onofre Camp Pendleton lease until Edison agrees to replace thin-wall canisters with proven thick-wall transportable storage casks.  This is a national security issue. If the NRC cannot do their job, maybe it’s time to bring in the Marines. The Navy has nuclear experts.

The current storage system puts the public at risk. Nuclear waste stored in thin-wall steel canisters (only 5/8? thick) cannot be inspected, repaired or safely transported. Thin-wall canisters crack, but technology does not exist to inspect for cracks or repair cracks once canisters are filled with highly radioactive nuclear fuel waste.

The President of Holtec has stated a through-wall crack will release millions of curies of radionuclides and it’s not practical to repair them, even if you could find the cracks.

Yet, they have no plan in place  to stop or contain a cracking, radiation-leaking, and potentially exploding canister.

Each canister contains roughly a Chernobyl nuclear disaster.  Once canisters explode, the radionuclides will travel with the wind, similar to how smoke traveled with the California Camp Fire.

San Onofre will have 73 canisters stored on-site by mid 2019.

Link to Article

Posted by on Dec 9, 2018 in Jim's Take on the Market, Local Flavor, Local Government, The Future | 11 comments

Residential Instead of Golf?

They should ditch the Park Hyatt Motor Lodge, bring back the Four Seasons, and have lunch today with Toll Brothers (who built 672 homes at the 200-acre Robertson Ranch).  If they can build 500 homes on the roughly 200 acres of golf course, the dirt would be worth close to what the new owners paid for the whole package.  They will have picked up a 327-room luxury resort with average room rate of $250-$300 per night….for practically nothing.  

Hat tip just some guy. An excerpt from the U-T story:

The upscale Park Hyatt Aviara resort, which was taken over by its lender more than a year ago following missed payments, is now under new ownership.

Xenia Hotels & Resorts, a Florida-based real estate investment trust that owns 41 hotels across 17 states, including the Andaz in downtown San Diego, announced last week that it paid $170 million for the 327-room resort and golf course.

The selling price is considerably below the $251 million paid by former owner Broadreach Capital Partners in 2007 to acquire a controlling interest.

Xenia CEO Marcel Verbaas acknowledged the price’s appeal in a news release.

“Our ability to purchase the resort at a price substantially below replacement cost and well below those of comparable resorts in the region provides a significant value creation opportunity for the company,” Verbaas said.

Xenia executives declined to discuss the sale or their plans for upgrading the 222-acre resort but hinted in the news release that there will be upcoming improvements.

“We see substantial opportunities to enhance financial performance at the resort through our asset management initiatives as well as a comprehensive capital plan to elevate the resort above its prior competitive positioning,” Verbaas said. “We look forward to working with Hyatt to improve the asset physically and operationally which we believe will improve the resort’s regional and national appeal and result in strong growth in revenues and profitability.”

Although it’s been almost 1 ½ years since the Park Hyatt was taken over by its lender, CW Capital Asset Management, a sale probably took longer because the property includes a golf course, speculates broker Alan Reay.

Increasingly, more and more golf courses are closing, and in California they can be expensive to operate given the dry conditions and the cost of water, said Reay, CEO of Atlas Hospitality.

“Most properties in San Diego are back at the peak levels of 2007 or above so it’s interesting that this property did not get back to that level, and one of the main reasons for that is the golf course,” he said. “Whenever we’re working on a hotel with a golf course associated with it, most buyers are not interested. It’s not what it used to be.”

“I think they’ll definitely get room rates up if they make improvements, but the big question is what do you do with the golf course,” Reay said. “In many instances, we’re seeing golf courses sold off and then people do residential or a different development on that.”

 

Posted by on Nov 29, 2018 in Carlsbad, Jim's Take on the Market, Local Flavor, Market Buzz | 6 comments

Hometainers

I love this idea – but $140,000 each? Hat tip Eddie89!

The region’s first housing project made from shipping containers could open as soon as April, providing homes for 21 formerly homeless veterans and possibly paving the way for hundreds of new affordable and median-priced homes in the near future.

The units are planned for a vacant lot at 2941 Imperial Ave. in Logan Heights.  Each 320-square-foot unit would have its own patio, kitchen and bathroom. While the units will be built from metal shipping containers, they will be insulated and have interior drywalls.

Read More

Posted by on Oct 25, 2018 in Homeless Cure, Ideas/Solutions, Jim's Take on the Market, Local Flavor, Local Government | 4 comments

Extreme Sailing Oct 18-21

With the racing taking place just five metres from the shore of Harbor Island, the man-made peninsula located close to Downtown San Diego, the Series looks set to make a show-stopping return to the Americas for the penultimate Act. Enjoying a very temperate climate, the Californian city of San Diego sees consistent breezes, making it a favorite sailing spot for California and the rest of the west coast.

The eighth-largest city in the US, San Diego is known for its beautiful weather and pristine beaches as well its plethora of entertainment. Take in the ocean views at Sunset Cliffs Natural Park, try out the outstanding Mexican food, visit one of the many great surf spots, or take a trip to one of the numerous museums, zoos or theme parks.

https://sandiegoextremesailing.com/

Posted by on Oct 17, 2018 in Jim's Take on the Market, Local Flavor | 0 comments

Palomar Airport Extension Approved

Wondering what the Boeing 737 airplane needs for a runway? 

The minimum runway distance for a 737 is 6,800ft.  This proposal only extends the current runway to 5,697ft.

The article:

The San Diego County Board of Supervisors voted unanimously Wednesdsay to approve a new 20-year master plan for the McClellan-Palomar Airport. Supervisor Kristin Gaspar recused herself.

Part of the update includes extending the existing runway up to 800 feet. The county of San Diego said this would allow airplanes to reach the East Coast, Europe and China without having to refuel.

People living in the area are concerned that a longer runway could mean a lot of noisy planes — but Supervisor Bill Horn, who is also a pilot, said technology is helping fix that.

“Those airplanes are a lot quieter than the old stuff,” Horn said. “And that’s just going to improve the noise issue.”

A report from county staff said a longer runway would mean airplanes are able to increase elevation sooner after takeoff which could also reduce noise on the ground.

An economic analysis shows that by 2030 the Palomar airport could support more than 4,500 jobs and provide $33 million in state and local tax revenue. The runway extension project is expected to take 13 to 20 years to complete, depending on available funding.

The airport is constructed over portions of an inactive landfill, and stakeholders commented that runway extensions constructed over landfill areas could damage the methane collection system and impact the environment. Prior to construction of any improvements on the landfill, the methane collection system will be re-designed to accommodate the improvements.

Any runway extension that requires construction over areas of inactive landfill may not be fully eligible for the FAA’s usual 90% grant share since FAA has indicated they may be reluctant to fund projects that result from the County’s placement of the landfills.

Link to KPBS article

Posted by on Oct 11, 2018 in Jim's Take on the Market, Local Flavor, Local Government | 7 comments

Purple Church

OK, now this gentrification stuff has gone too far. Hat tip Laker Joe!

Gentrification has accomplished what eluded city bureaucrats for decades.

Oceanside’s Main Attraction, North County’s only remaining topless club, is going away. A five-story 308-unit, apartment complex is proposed as its replacement.

Known to locals as “the purple church,” the Main Attraction bar and restaurant hosts between eight to 20 ladies a night who dance on stage around a brass pole while a DJ spins “Cherry Pie” or “Pour Some Sugar on Me.” Admission is $11 every night after 6 pm but $14 for the once-a-month “amateur night.” Dancers are topless but never fully nude. Once inside, patrons are frequently asked if they would to pay extra for a private lap dance.

“It is my understanding this property is being sold to a developer,” says former mayor Terry Johnson who adds that getting the topless bar off that city entryway will be good for the whole street. “I am sure things will now start moving with the [long closed] Bridge Motor Inn property [to the north]. They can now get a Hilton or Marriott to come in. And things will start moving with the Motel Six property and the vacant Mira Mar building to the south.”

Link to Full Article

Posted by on Oct 6, 2018 in Jim's Take on the Market, Local Flavor, Local Government | 2 comments

La Jolla Art & Wine Festival

What: The La Jolla Art & Wine Festival

Where: Girard Ave, La Jolla

When: Saturday, October 6, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday, October 7, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Why: To bring our artists’ roots back to La Jolla, to celebrate our wonderful community, and to raise money for underfunded programs such as art, music, science, physical education, and technology, at the local public elementary and middle schools.

Cost: FREE!

http://www.ljawf.com/

Posted by on Oct 5, 2018 in Jim's Take on the Market, La Jolla, Local Flavor | 0 comments

Ponto’s Last Stand

From the Reader:

Pressure to develop a project on one of North County’s last, large coastal properties may be coming to a head, but not if the residents in the South Carlsbad community of Ponto have anything to say about it.

So far, members of a neighborhood association, People for Ponto, say they’ve been shut out of the decade-long discussions on the best use for the 11-acre property between Carlsbad Boulevard (Coast Highway 101) east to the train tracks, and north of Avenida Encinas.

A spokesperson for the group, Lance Schulte, was a city planner when Carlsbad’s growth management plan was created. “I’m not anti-development,” he said. However the group believes this is the most intensive development, existing or proposed, in the entire city of Carlsbad.

Based on a planning formula known as floor area ratio, the proposed residential development is 344 percent more dense than the Cape Rey Hilton Resort near by. “It would also be five feet taller,” said Schulte.

“The city has falsely exempted development in Ponto from providing minimum open space,” said Schulte. “We don’t know how this happened and how developers got away with this.”

Read More

Posted by on Oct 2, 2018 in Carlsbad, Jim's Take on the Market, Local Flavor | 2 comments