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An Insider's Guide to North San Diego County's Coastal Real Estate
Jim Klinge, broker-associate
858-997-3801
klingerealty@gmail.com
Compass
617 Saxony Place, Suite 101
Encinitas, CA 92024
Klinge Realty
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Are you looking for an experienced agent to help you buy or sell a home? Contact Jim the Realtor!

Jim Klinge
Cell/Text: (858) 997-3801
klingerealty@gmail.com
701 Palomar Airport Road, Suite 300
Carlsbad, CA 92011


Category Archive: ‘Local Flavor’

App for Beach Access

YourCoast shows users a map of 1,563 access points that the commission tracks along the California coast. Historically, this information has been available in California Coastal Access Guide books published every few years. In recent years (as a byproduct of the punitive Parker app development process), it has also been available on the commission’s website.

Click on a particular access point and the app shows photos of the path to the beach — which can often be hard to find — and whether there are amenities such as parking, access for disabled visitors (with information on how to procure a beach wheelchair), restrooms or fishing facilities.

Users can also search for beaches with specific amenities and submit updated photos or report a violation to the commission. If visiting a remote stretch of coast, users can save the map and info on their phone for offline access.

The app marks as closed access points that are currently under dispute — and some remain unlisted. The commission is now tussling over access to 8.5 miles of coastline at Hollister Ranch in Santa Barbara County, and a number of access points in Malibu are notoriously contentious. Another tech billionaire, Vinod Khosla, has fought coastal officials for almost a decade over access to Martins Beach, a secluded stretch of sand south of Half Moon Bay. Hollister Ranch is not listed in the app; Martins Beach is marked “currently closed.”

Jennifer Savage, California policy manager for the Surfrider Foundation, said an app like this could empower more people to explore more of California’s coastline.

“There are so many places that aren’t obvious, and that’s a huge problem,” she said. “Having an app that just spells everything out is so reassuring, it makes you so much more confident that you’re in the right place.”

Link to Article

Posted by on Feb 7, 2019 in Jim's Take on the Market, Local Flavor | 0 comments

Coronado Bridge Construction

For those who get a little queasy while driving over the Coronado Bridge, looking at these photos from its construction might help:

https://tinyurl.com/y8byqbhn

One of the comments – Beautiful pictures –thank you. For those of us who lived “State-side” and had to commute to jobs on North Island via monotonous ferry or long Silver Strand drive, we were thrilled to watch this beautiful bridge take shape. A little note for those wondering why the long, sweeping arch: the bridge had to be high enough for Navy ships to pass under it. A straight line from San Diego to Coronado would not allow for enough height; the roadway would simply be too steep at both ends. The long, sweeping arch shape allowed for enough roadway distance to get to the required height with a reasonable grade. Nice. It added greatly to the aesthetics. While many residents of Coronado were not happy, most San Diegans were thrilled and still are to have this beautiful bridge.

Posted by on Jan 29, 2019 in Jim's Take on the Market, Local Flavor | 0 comments

Leucadia Beachfront Hotel

From the UT with hat tip to WC Varones (JMI = John Moores, ex-Padres owner):

Developers have finally started construction activity this week on a Leucadia bluff-top hotel project that’s been talked about for decades.

Located just west of La Costa Avenue’s intersection with Coast Highway 101 and part of a site that once contained the Cabo Grill, the 4.3-acre property will become home to a $110 million, 130-room hotel. The luxury hotel, which will have ocean views from all but two of its guest rooms, is scheduled to open for business in November 2020.

Fenway Capital purchased the property about 13 months ago and is working jointly with JMI Realty to develop the land, which was once owned by KSL Resorts, Jackel said. Long ago, this property was envisioned as a companion property — kind of a “beach club” — to the La Costa Resort & Spa just east of El Camino Real, he added.

People passing the site initially will notice little more than new fencing, construction trailers and some surveying work. But at the end of January, a hotel project-funded sand replenishment will start on the beach below the bluff. Contractors will be adding 45,000 cubic yards of sand to the beach between late January and the end of February.

A public staircase in the area will remain and a new beach access pathway will be added from La Costa Avenue as part of the hotel development, Jackel said. The new pathway is scheduled to open just before the start of summer in 2020, a construction timeline indicates.

https://encinitasbeachhotel.com/

Link to Full Article

Posted by on Jan 13, 2019 in Jim's Take on the Market, Leucadia, Local Flavor, View | 0 comments

Family-Friendly States

Source: WalletHub

California is #19, and Minnesota is #1?

I’d like a recount!

Being dead last in housing affordability probably sunk us.

To determine the best states in which to put down family roots, WalletHub compared the 50 states across 49 key indicators of family-friendliness.

The data set ranges from median family salary to housing affordability to unemployment rate.

Raising a Family in California (1=Best; 25=Avg.):

  • 5th – % of Families with Young Kids
  • 46th – Child-Care Costs (Adjusted for Median Family Income)
  • 5th – Infant-Mortality Rate
  • 49th – Median Family Salary (Adjusted for Cost of Living)
  • 36th – Violent-Crime Rate
  • 34th – % of Families in Poverty
  • 50th – Housing Affordability
  • 38th – Unemployment Rate
  • 15th – Separation & Divorce Rate

For the full report, please visit:

https://wallethub.com/edu/best-states-to-raise-a-family/31065/

Posted by on Jan 8, 2019 in Jim's Take on the Market, Local Flavor | 0 comments

Defective Nuclear-Waste Storage

Are you looking for one more reason to move away? 

It sounds like if/when the Big One starts shaking, you will need to grab everything you own and move to Yuma.

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) admits in their November 28, 2018 NRC Inspection Report and Notice of Violation, every Holtec canister downloaded into the storage holes is damaged due to inadequate clearance between the canister and the divider shell in the storage hole (vault).  The NRC states canister walls are already “worn”.  This results in cracks. Once cracks start, they continue to grow through the wall.

The NRC stated Southern California Edison (and Holtec) knew about this since January 2018, but continued to load 29 canisters anyway.  Edison’s August 24, 2018 press release states they plan to finish loading mid 2019.

The NRC states Edison must stop loading canisters until this issue is resolved.  However, there is no method to inspect or repair cracking canisters and the NRC knows this.

The NRC should require all San Onofre thin-wall canisters be replaced with thick-wall transportable storage casks.  These are the only proven dry storage systems that can be inspected, maintained, repaired and monitored in a manner to prevent major radiological releases and explosions.

California state agencies should revoke San Onofre permits and withhold Decommissioning Trust Funds until these issues are resolved.

The Navy should consider revoking the San Onofre Camp Pendleton lease until Edison agrees to replace thin-wall canisters with proven thick-wall transportable storage casks.  This is a national security issue. If the NRC cannot do their job, maybe it’s time to bring in the Marines. The Navy has nuclear experts.

The current storage system puts the public at risk. Nuclear waste stored in thin-wall steel canisters (only 5/8? thick) cannot be inspected, repaired or safely transported. Thin-wall canisters crack, but technology does not exist to inspect for cracks or repair cracks once canisters are filled with highly radioactive nuclear fuel waste.

The President of Holtec has stated a through-wall crack will release millions of curies of radionuclides and it’s not practical to repair them, even if you could find the cracks.

Yet, they have no plan in place  to stop or contain a cracking, radiation-leaking, and potentially exploding canister.

Each canister contains roughly a Chernobyl nuclear disaster.  Once canisters explode, the radionuclides will travel with the wind, similar to how smoke traveled with the California Camp Fire.

San Onofre will have 73 canisters stored on-site by mid 2019.

Link to Article

Posted by on Dec 9, 2018 in Jim's Take on the Market, Local Flavor, Local Government, The Future | 11 comments

Residential Instead of Golf?

They should ditch the Park Hyatt Motor Lodge, bring back the Four Seasons, and have lunch today with Toll Brothers (who built 672 homes at the 200-acre Robertson Ranch).  If they can build 500 homes on the roughly 200 acres of golf course, the dirt would be worth close to what the new owners paid for the whole package.  They will have picked up a 327-room luxury resort with average room rate of $250-$300 per night….for practically nothing.  

Hat tip just some guy. An excerpt from the U-T story:

The upscale Park Hyatt Aviara resort, which was taken over by its lender more than a year ago following missed payments, is now under new ownership.

Xenia Hotels & Resorts, a Florida-based real estate investment trust that owns 41 hotels across 17 states, including the Andaz in downtown San Diego, announced last week that it paid $170 million for the 327-room resort and golf course.

The selling price is considerably below the $251 million paid by former owner Broadreach Capital Partners in 2007 to acquire a controlling interest.

Xenia CEO Marcel Verbaas acknowledged the price’s appeal in a news release.

“Our ability to purchase the resort at a price substantially below replacement cost and well below those of comparable resorts in the region provides a significant value creation opportunity for the company,” Verbaas said.

Xenia executives declined to discuss the sale or their plans for upgrading the 222-acre resort but hinted in the news release that there will be upcoming improvements.

“We see substantial opportunities to enhance financial performance at the resort through our asset management initiatives as well as a comprehensive capital plan to elevate the resort above its prior competitive positioning,” Verbaas said. “We look forward to working with Hyatt to improve the asset physically and operationally which we believe will improve the resort’s regional and national appeal and result in strong growth in revenues and profitability.”

Although it’s been almost 1 ½ years since the Park Hyatt was taken over by its lender, CW Capital Asset Management, a sale probably took longer because the property includes a golf course, speculates broker Alan Reay.

Increasingly, more and more golf courses are closing, and in California they can be expensive to operate given the dry conditions and the cost of water, said Reay, CEO of Atlas Hospitality.

“Most properties in San Diego are back at the peak levels of 2007 or above so it’s interesting that this property did not get back to that level, and one of the main reasons for that is the golf course,” he said. “Whenever we’re working on a hotel with a golf course associated with it, most buyers are not interested. It’s not what it used to be.”

“I think they’ll definitely get room rates up if they make improvements, but the big question is what do you do with the golf course,” Reay said. “In many instances, we’re seeing golf courses sold off and then people do residential or a different development on that.”

 

Posted by on Nov 29, 2018 in Carlsbad, Jim's Take on the Market, Local Flavor, Market Buzz | 6 comments