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Jim Klinge
Cell/Text: (858) 997-3801
klingerealty@gmail.com
701 Palomar Airport Road, Suite 300
Carlsbad, CA 92011


Category Archive: ‘Local Flavor’

Happy Valentine’s Day

Example of old Chevy trucks for sale

Here is some insight on the truck sale, plus a curiosity check on why the West Bistro closed in January, which was very unusual, given who the owners are. Was it an indicator of the local economy?

I hope they don’t mind some blog attention, because the owners look like they are doing great things here:

http://www.westhealth.org/what-we-do/

Posted by on Feb 14, 2018 in Carlsbad, Jim's Take on the Market, Local Flavor | 1 comment

Torrey Pines Paragliding

Those who took in the pro golf and spectacular weather at Torrey Pines today also saw a number of paragliders in the background.  It reminded me of our reader Murph checking out the bluff-front houses:


Here’s how he described his close calls:

During my “formative” flying days (about 3 years ago) I had quite a reputation at the Torrey Pines Gliderport. Some of my hair-raising moments included……..

**I was losing lift and trying to make it back to the gliderport, but could not make it so I had to land at Black’s beach. This is rather routine as you just aim for a dry section of sand. Well, as I was rounding a bend and setting up for a final *flare* to land I realized that it was high tide and that particular section of beach did not exist anymore! I landed in 4 feet of water and began a mad panic to unclip my gear before the waves sucked me and my wing back out to sea.

Never have I been so happy to see a middle aged nude guy, as he raced into the surf and held onto my paraglider so I could extricate myself!

**Once while flying over the Torrey Pines Reserve area the wind got too strong and I landed traveling BACKWARDS on the north side of Torrey Pines Rd with my wing draped over a tree. The lifeguards showed up and left when I told them I was uninjured. 15 minutes later I started hearing lots of sirens. They started getting louder and before I knew it there were 4 emergency vehicles there. I told them I was okay so they all left….including a hook and ladder truck that COULD HAVE helped me get my wing out of the tree, but hey…I was alive AND unhurt so no worries here!

** My alternative landing stories also include one where I was trying to fly with the big-boys above Scripps aquarium. In my attempt to make it back to the lift-band along the cliffs I sunk-out and had to land right on La Jolla Shores Dr. Fortunately for me a construction truck not only yielded, but even gave me a ride back to the gliderport!

Luckily I have never hurt myself or anyone else. Torrey Pines is actually a very safe paragliding site……as long as you stay within your comfort zone and fly smart.  The more I fly the more conservative I get. My library of noteworthy “stories” has not expanded in the last couple years.


Posted by on Jan 27, 2018 in Bubbleinfo Readers, Bubbleinfo TV, Jim's Take on the Market, La Jolla, Local Flavor | 5 comments

#WeAllCount

I got an early start this morning and joined the nationwide annual event of counting our homeless population.  About 50 volunteers met at the Encinitas headquarters of the Community Resource Center on Second Street downtown at 4:00am today.

We split up into teams, and figured we’d be working the beach area.  Instead, everyone was assigned a census tract between Del Mar and Carlsbad in order to provide full coverage.

Our section was in Carmel Valley, and half of our designated area was filled with gated communities so we mostly poked around Pacific Highlands Ranch.

We did see one guy sleeping in his car near the on-going construction, and that was the closest we got to finding anyone who might be homeless.  But I’m glad they include those living in cars because the lack of affordable housing is impacting those who have jobs – but can’t afford to live here.

The goal is to identify how big the problem is, and then work to solve it.  If you’d like to participate, check the San Diego Regional Task Force on the Homeless, who has the vision of ending homelessness in the San Diego region:

SD Regional Task Force website

I was 83.28:


Posted by on Jan 26, 2018 in About the author, Homeless Cure, Jim's Take on the Market, Local Flavor | 5 comments

Climate Zones

From Sunset magazine:

Link to article

ZONE 23: Thermal belts of Southern California’s coastal climate

One of the most favored areas in North America for growing subtropical plants, Zone 23 has always been Southern California’s best zone for avocados. Frosts don’t amount to much here, because 85 percent of the time, Pacific Ocean weather dominates; interior air rules only 15 percent of the time. A notorious portion of this 15 percent consists of those days when hot, dry Santa Ana winds blow. Zone 23 lacks either the summer heat or the winter cold necessary to grow pears, most apples, and most peaches. But it enjoys considerably more heat than Zone 24—enough to put the sweetness in ‘Valencia’ oranges, for example—but not enough for ‘Washington’ naval oranges, which are grown farther inland. Temperatures are mild here, but severe winters descend at times. Average lows range from 43 to 48°F (6 to 9°C), while extreme lows average from 34 to 27°F (1 to –3°C).

ZONE 24: Marine influence along the Southern California coast

Stretched along Southern California’s beaches, this climate zone is almost completely dominated by the ocean. Where the beach runs along high cliffs or palisades, Zone 24 extends only to that barrier. But where hills are low or nonexistent, it runs inland several miles.

This zone has a mild marine climate (milder than Northern California’s maritime Zone 17) because south of Point Conception, the Pacific is comparatively warm. The winters are mild, the summers cool, and the air seldom really dry. On many days in spring and early summer, the sun doesn’t break through the high overcast until afternoon. Tender perennials like geraniums and impatiens rarely go out of bloom here; spathiphyllums and pothos become outdoor plants; and tender palms are safe from killing frosts. In this climate, gardens that include such plants as ornamental figs, rubber trees, and scheffleras can become jungles.

Posted by on Jan 21, 2018 in Jim's Take on the Market, Local Flavor, Tips, Advice & Links | 0 comments

Kemp Back On Market

Matt Kemp, who is back with the Dodgers following an offseason trade, has put his mansion in the Heritage Estates, a guard-gated community in Poway, back up for sale. The asking price is $7.95 million.

Features of the 15,884-square-foot home, which Kemp has spent about $3 million to update, include custom travertine floors, a cigar lounge with a humidor and a 1,200-bottle wine cellar with a tasting room. A custom home theater is outfitted with tiered seating and a snack bar.  It also has a tennis court, a separate pool/guest house with a gym and a roman spa, plus an infinity-edge swimming pool on about 4 acres of grounds.

The estate was headed for the auction block last year before the slugging outfielder elected not to proceed with the sale. He bought the San Diego County property in 2013 for $9.075 million, records show.

Zillow listing LA Times article

Posted by on Jan 15, 2018 in Jim's Take on the Market, Local Flavor | 5 comments

Methane in Chula Vista

Hat tip to Richard for sending this in:

Methane and volatile chemicals such as benzene have been discovered underground at a yet-to-be completed Otay Ranch project that is marketed as one of the largest planned housing developments in the U.S.

Homebuyers in the Chula Vista community known as Village of Escaya can’t move into their homes because government officials have stopped installation of water meters.

inewsource is the first to report on the discovery, though contractors first noticed the potential problem in April. Water sampling began the following month and the San Diego County Department of Environmental Health was alerted in June.

“The district is doing its due diligence to make sure that they’re evaluating the situation,” Otay Water District spokeswoman Tenille Otero said Friday.

The Otay Water District provides water and wastewater service to nearly a quarter-million customers in San Diego County. It typically takes responsibility for a developer’s work, including pipes and facilities, once a project is completed. In this case, the district is refusing to install water meters within the 450-acre development until the problems with the methane and other chemicals are resolved.

Other agencies involved include the Chula Vista Development Services Department and Chula Vista Elementary School District, as well as several private companies.

The land’s developer, Carlsbad-based HomeFed Corp., is marketing nearly 1,000 homes in an area adjacent to the Otay Landfill, auto-salvage yards and the country’s largest producer of construction aggregates. According to HomeFed’s most recent quarterly report, 165 homes were under contract to close within Escaya as of Oct. 24.

HomeFed’s president and chief executive officer, Paul Borden, told inewsource on Friday the discovery of methane and other volatile compounds is not unusual in California.

“It’s going to be dealt with absolutely the way it should be dealt with,” Borden said, adding that HomeFed is working out mitigation measures with the water district. The matter will be resolved “very soon,” he said.

Borden said homebuyers also have been alerted to the issue.

“Among the many many things that are disclosed, this is definitely one of them,” he said.

Read full article here:

LINK

Posted by on Dec 12, 2017 in Jim's Take on the Market, Local Flavor | 7 comments

Bel Air Fire

Another fire broke out this morning near the 405 freeway in Bel Air, and it reminded me of the Big One in 1961 when 484 homes were lost.  As a result of this fire, the City of Los Angeles was able to initiate a series of fire safety policies and several laws, including the outlawing of wood shake/shingle roofs.

My Dad sold roofing materials at the time, and his company gave him a copy of this film – and I used to take it to school during fire season:

http://www.lafdmuseum.org/bel-air-fire

https://la.curbed.com/2017/12/6/16742976/bel-air-fire-history-brentwood-nixon

Posted by on Dec 6, 2017 in About the author, Jim's Take on the Market, Local Flavor | 3 comments