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Category Archive: ‘Local Flavor’

Thanksgiving Eating Tips

happy thanksgiving

From everyone at Klinge Realty, thank you for being a friend and client – we appreciate you, and are grateful for your support.

Seen at MND:


1.  Avoid carrot sticks. Anyone who puts carrots on a holiday buffet table knows nothing of the Holiday spirit. In fact, if you see carrots, leave immediately. Go next door, where they’re serving rum balls.

2. Drink as much eggnog as you can. And quickly. It’s rare. You cannot find it any other time of year but now. So drink up! Who cares that it has 10,000 calories in every sip? It’s not as if you’re going to turn into an eggnog-alcoholic or something. It’s a treat. Enjoy it. Have one for me. Have two. It’s later than you think. It will soon be Christmas!

3. If something comes with gravy, use it. That’s the whole point of gravy. Gravy does not stand alone. Pour it on. Make a volcano out of your mashed potatoes. Fill it with gravy. Eat the volcano. Repeat.

4. As for mashed potatoes, always ask if they’re made with skim milk or whole milk. If it’s skim, pass. Why bother? It’s like buying a sports car with an automatic transmission.

5. Do not have a snack before going to a party in an effort to control your eating. The whole point of going to a holiday party is to eat other people’s food for free. Lots of it. Hello?

6. Under no circumstances should you exercise between now and New Year’s. You can do that in January when you have nothing else to do. This is the time for long naps, which you’ll need after circling the buffet table while carrying a 10-pound plate of food and that vat of eggnog.

7. If you come across something really good at a buffet table, like frosted Christmas cookies in the shape and size of Santa, position yourself near them and don’t budge. Have as many as you can before becoming the center of attention. They’re like a beautiful pair of shoes. If you leave them behind, you’re never going to see them again.

8. Same for pies. Apple, Pumpkin, Mincemeat. Have a slice of each. Or if you don’t like mincemeat, have two apples and one pumpkin. Always have three. When else do you get to have more than one dessert? Labor Day?

9. Did someone mention fruitcake? Granted, it’s loaded with the mandatory celebratory calories, but avoid it at all cost. I mean, please, have some standards!

10. One final tip: Wear sweatpants/loose fitting clothing. If you are leaving the party and you can walk without help from a construction forklift, you haven’t been paying attention. Re-read tips; start over, but hurry, January is just around the corner.

Remember this HST motto to live by: “Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate and wine in one hand, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming “WOO HOO what a ride!”

Have a great holiday season!!

Posted by on Nov 25, 2015 in Jim's Take on the Market, Local Flavor | 0 comments


There have been 54 major earthquakes in California since 1900, defined as an earthquake of at least magnitude 6.5, and/or causing loss of life or property damage greater than $200,000, according to the California Geological Survey. The last major earthquake was a magnitude 6.5 and occurred on December 22, 2003 in San Simeon, causing substantial damage in nearby Paso Robles.

With 54 major earthquakes over the past 115+ years, one major earthquake occurs on average every 2.1 years. Therefore, it appears California is well overdue for a major earthquake.

Where will the next big earthquake occur?

Statistically, the next “big one” (of around magnitude 8.0) will occur along the southern end of the San Andreas Fault, according to geologist Pat Abbott of San Diego State University.

Most of California’s populated areas are located in or near an earthquake hazard zone. The exception is California’s Central Valley, encompassing cities like Fresno and Sacramento (property lying east of I-5 north of Delano and south of Redding). Here, you are as safe as you can be (in California) from earthquakes.


The map above shows a broad picture of earthquake fault zones — the yellow and red boxes — in Southern California (the blue boxes are landslide and liquefaction zones and the red boxes are both earthquake and landslide zones).

There are 105 cities in California that contain earthquake hazard zones (view the list here). However, just because a city is listed doesn’t mean that the entire city is in an earthquake hazard zone. To find out if a specific property is located in an earthquake hazard zone or any other hazard zone, view maps at the property’s local planning department.

Read more here:

Posted by on Nov 19, 2015 in Jim's Take on the Market, Local Flavor | 5 comments

Economic Driver

grow facilities in colo

We will probably see more initiatives on the ballot about legalizing marijuana in California – maybe as soon as 2016?  Look at the boost it has given Denver’s real estate market – and paying wild premiums too:

One in 11 industrial buildings in central Denver is full of marijuana.

The state’s cannabis industry occupies at least 3.7 million square feet of industrial space in Denver, clustered in areas of older warehouse stock, including the Interstate 25-Interstate 70 junction, Montbello, central Denver and along the Santa Fe Drive corridor in southwest Denver, according to commercial real estate firm CBRE.

CBRE’s research team conducted the first in-depth study of pot’s impact on the city’s commercial real estate market, looking at the early years of medical and retail marijuana in Denver.

Between 2009 and 2014, the industry’s appetite for real estate was voracious, with marijuana cultivation gobbling up more than a third — 35.8 percent — of all industrial space leased in Denver during that five-year period.

Read full story here:

Posted by on Oct 21, 2015 in Jim's Take on the Market, Local Flavor, The Future | 0 comments

Downtown Tour


I mentioned the downtown San Diego open house tour on Saturday, and got there myself for just a glimpse – here’s a sampling of the diverse buildings on this year’s list:

The actual mission-style building that houses the San Diego Chinese Museum was physically moved from a couple of blocks over. They have photos of that and other historic shots when you visit in person. For a youtube tour, click here:

Posted by on Oct 18, 2015 in Bubbleinfo TV, Historic Homes, Interesting Houses, Jim's Take on the Market, Local Flavor | 0 comments

Saturday Open House Tours

university club

Saturday is the big open house day, with dozens of properties around town available for touring!

Launching this October 17th, 2015, Open House San Diego | Downtown will preview the Open House concept and get the ball rolling towards a city and potentially county wide Open House program in 2017. In conjunction with San Diego Downtown Partnership, 40+ buildings and design and architecture studios will be open for you to explore – for free.

The University Club is on the list too (photo above), and if you’ve never been there, it is worth the trip – great views of downtown!

Posted by on Oct 16, 2015 in Jim's Take on the Market, Local Flavor | 0 comments


la jolla

Enjoy local architecture in October, with lectures, exhibitions, and tours scheduled throughout the month – from the UT:

Fantastic opportunities in the second and third tours:


“Sundays with Save Our Heritage Organisation,” at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. each Sunday in October, Balboa Park and other locations; see for details.

Modern San Diego home tours, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Oct. 10; self-guided tours of six homes, $40; tickets at

“Oh! San Diego” open house tours of 41 sites, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Oct. 17; free. See details at

American Society of Interior Designers Kitchen and Bath tour, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Oct. 24; $25; tickets available from

Posted by on Oct 3, 2015 in Historic Homes, Interesting Houses, Jim's Take on the Market, Local Flavor | 0 comments

99 Homes

The foreclosure movie ’99 Homes’ is out – here is the review from Variety:

Here is what the had to say:

“99 Homes,” a gripping, intelligent thriller set amid the bursting of the nation’s housing bubble, zeroes in on the ruination of the American dream and the morally bankrupt characters who profited from the carnage. Like “The Grapes of Wrath,” it’s a classic example of how to take a social issue and turn it into riveting cinema.

The story opens in an Orlando, Fla., bathroom, where a family man has just killed himself to avoid the specter of being thrown out of his foreclosed home. Not long after the yellow police tape has been set up, real estate broker Rick Carver (the incomparable Michael Shannon) is prowling the premises, with an e-cigarette in his mouth, a cell phone in his ear and a gun attached to his ankle. Carver needs to make sure that the dead man’s grieving wife and kids are shooed off the grounds, so he can keep his banker clients happy.

Then it’s off to another residence, where Carver’s next victim awaits: down-on-his-luck construction worker Dennis Nash (Andrew Garfield, back in top form after his “Spider-Man” foray), his mother (the always reliable Laura Dern) and his son. It’s the first of many evictions in this movie, and director Ramin Bahraini imbues all of them with a palpable sense of terror, anguish and heartbreak.

As it turns out, Carver sees a lot of leadership potential in the handyman Nash, who ends up striking a Faustian deal in which he helps the ruthless broker with evictions in exchange for financial help. Because of Garfield’s skill, and the strength of the script, we sympathize with the desperate Nash and his love for his home, even as he forecloses on his moral values.

Likewise, Shannon provides interesting shadings to Carver. On the surface, he’s Gordon Gekko with a “Miami Vice” outfit, but it’s clear that Carver doesn’t enjoy what he’s doing or view it simply as a way to get rich. Instead, he sees himself as a player trying to survive in a game that’s been rigged against 99 percent of the population. Shannon manages to convey an inner loneliness, a quiet desperation that he’s gone too far but can’t turn back.

The movie trailer:

Posted by on Sep 30, 2015 in Foreclosures, Jim's Take on the Market, Local Flavor, Real Estate Investing | 1 comment