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Are you looking for an experienced agent to help you buy or sell a home? Contact Jim the Realtor!

Jim Klinge
Cell/Text: (858) 997-3801
klingerealty@gmail.com
701 Palomar Airport Road, Suite 300
Carlsbad, CA 92011


Category Archive: ‘Bubbleinfo TV’

O-hain New Homes

Close-up photo:

This new-home tract (in red circle) is due east of La Costa and behind Knightsbridge for those who know Olivenhain. These can be described as Robertson-Ranch quality on bigger secluded lots for less than twice the price. This same builder sold out the 1 Channel Island in spite of the odds so they should have a go of it here (Encinitas schools too). Green line is the old dump. Click on any of my photos for larger image.


There are nine models that range in price from $2,094,000 to $3,119,000. The base tax rate is approximately 1.05965%, plus Mello-Roos assessment of $1,430 per year. The HOA fee is $420 per month for private streets, mailboxes, fencing, and common-area landscaping.

Posted by on Apr 22, 2018 in Bubbleinfo TV, Builders, Encinitas | 9 comments

Robertson Wrap Up

It was almost four years to the day that the drone visited Robertson Ranch – before the development began.  Here is a post from 4/17/2014 when I was still piloting the drone, and hit my peak elevation:

http://www.bubbleinfo.com/2014/04/17/drone-at-robertson-ranch/

They only have six houses left to sell, plus the models, which means they’ve sold nearly 300 houses at an average of about $1,100,000 (guessing) in the last 2-3 years – or about 100 million-dollar-houses per year:

I’ve sold multiple houses across the street from the R-Ranch for less than $200,000. Now that they can get 13x times that money on what was a strawberry field five years ago is mind-boggling.

Posted by on Apr 14, 2018 in Bubbleinfo TV, Builders, Carlsbad, North County Coastal, Sales and Price Check, Why You Should Hire Jim as your Buyer's Agent, Why You Should List With Jim | 0 comments

My New Listing in West Carlsbad

My new listing in west Carlsbad has strong estimates of value:

I mention in the video that the house across the street just sold for $1,325,000, but it’s not on the MLS – it was an off-market sale.  Will it help propel our sale?  Maybe – as long as buyers and their agents know about it!  P.S. The zestimate dropped $18,763 once the listing populated from the MLS to Zillow.

Link to my listing on Zillow

Open house 12-3pm this Saturday and Sunday!

Posted by on Apr 12, 2018 in Bubbleinfo TV, Jim's Take on the Market, Listing Agent Practices, Why You Should List With Jim | 0 comments

Carmel Valley Comp

This 2,259sf house closed for $1,197,000 on March 15th, which was $12,000 over list price. The interesting part was when I went downstairs, there were buyers peppering the listing agent about making an offer on the spot – but the eventual buyers were represented by an outside agent/office.  Glad to report that there are other ethical agents!

Here is her video tour:

http://tours.previewfirst.com/ml/71613

Here is my view of the upstairs:

Posted by on Apr 3, 2018 in Bubbleinfo TV, Carmel Valley, Jim's Take on the Market, Listing Agent Practices | 0 comments

Effects of No-Foreclosure Policy

Here is a bunch of happy talk by three ivory-tower guys, but they never considered the consequences. Preventing foreclosures and pushing down mortgage rates helped to create a safety net that caused buyers to rush back into the market. Prices went up too quickly, trapping homeowners into their existing homes, rather than being able to move up, down, and around. Now only the affluent can afford a house, rents are skyrocketing, and homelessness is running rampant.

Hat tip to daytrip for sending this in:

The subprime mortgage crisis that broke out a decade ago is widely recalled as an uncontrolled and destructive plunge in housing prices. New research suggests, however, that at least one effort to halt the plunge was in fact quite effective. UCLA Anderson’s Stuart Gabriel, the Federal Reserve Board’s Matteo Iacoviello and Copenhagen Business School’s Chandler Lutz found that California’s 2008 anti-foreclosure law prevented the loss of some $470 billion in home value wealth.

The California law, examined against other anti-foreclosure efforts, stands as a potential model for future housing crisis interventions. The researchers found that the passage and implementation of the California Foreclosure Prevention Laws (CFPLs) simply and effectively made foreclosures more difficult and more expensive for lenders to initiate, slowing what could have been a more calamitous spiral in housing prices.

Limiting foreclosures is key to containing a housing panic. If foreclosures go unchecked in a crisis, they can spread. Because foreclosed-on houses are “priced to sell,” the first wave of foreclosures depresses the prices of all homes in the area. Additional borrowers who can’t make their payments then cannot sell without taking a loss, causing a second wave of foreclosures, further depressing prices. And a downward spiral has begun.

A wave of foreclosures seems to also produce a “disamenity effect”: someone who defaults on her mortgage slacks on maintaining the house, and its appearance of disrepair drags down the desirability of the neighborhood.

In some states, the law requires that lenders process foreclosures in state courts. Judicial foreclosure laws result in foreclosures costing much more time and money than they do in states like California, which does not have judicial foreclosure laws. The upside to not having judicial foreclosure laws is efficiency — for both the lenders and the government.

The downside is that, following market shocks, foreclosures are in danger of spiraling out of control, as they seemed to be in California in 2008. In the midst of the crisis, hundreds of thousands of people lost their homes to foreclosure, and it emerged that banks were “robo signing” on the procedural documents: They were pushing foreclosures through at an unreasonable rate, often without justification or authority to do so.

In 2008, California state senator Don Perata of Oakland authored SB-1137, the first of the California Foreclosure Prevention Laws. SB-1137, and the 2009 California Foreclosure Prevention Act after it, both increased the time and the monetary cost of foreclosing on property in California.

“The mortgage crisis is taking a terrible toll on Oakland and the rest of California,” said Perata, as quoted in the SB-1137 analysis. “It is crucial that we give homeowners the tools they need to avoid foreclosure when possible because that’s the best outcome for everybody.”  Gabriel, Lutz and Iacoviello’s research suggests these laws saved the state hundreds of billions of dollars.

Link to Article

Here’s a glimpse of how it’s working on the street today:

Posted by on Mar 29, 2018 in Bubbleinfo TV, Foreclosures, Jim's Take on the Market, No-Foreclosure as Banking Policy | 3 comments