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An Insider's Guide to North San Diego County's Coastal Real Estate
Jim Klinge, broker-associate
858-997-3801
klingerealty@gmail.com
Compass
617 Saxony Place, Suite 101
Encinitas, CA 92024
Klinge Realty
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Are you looking for an experienced agent to help you buy or sell a home? Contact Jim the Realtor!

Jim Klinge
Cell/Text: (858) 997-3801
klingerealty@gmail.com
701 Palomar Airport Road, Suite 300
Carlsbad, CA 92011


Category Archive: ‘ADU’

ADU Specialist

Remember when I mentioned the Carlsbad homeowner who told me that his plans for an ADU had gone six months without approval at the City?  Didn’t it make you think, “There has to be a better way”?

For those who are interested in pursuing an accessory dwelling unit for their property and want assistance, consider the service that Dave Probst offers.

Whether it’s a property you already own, or one you might buy, Dave will prepare a report for $655 that will include a preliminary plan and estimate of building costs.  For an additional fee, he can also deal with the city on your behalf, and, in most cases, he can get you ready for permits within 60 days.

I haven’t seen him in action myself, but other realtors around town have spoken of him highly.  He has a seminar scheduled at 4:00pm on May 11th at the Lexus Center in Escondido, and you can find more information at his website:

https://www.adubuildingplansandpermits.com/

Posted by on Apr 19, 2019 in ADU, Jim's Take on the Market, Remodel Projects | 0 comments

Instant House

With cities under pressure to provide affordable housing, it would be nice if there were ready-made buildings that a crane could drop onsite.

This is the right idea, but high-cost (probably more than most would spend).

If we could find a builder/factory that would sell them for half of this or less, I think there would be strong interest.  I’ll keep an eye out!


But this is the speed that would sell:


https://modulehousing.com/

Posted by on Feb 2, 2019 in ADU, Jim's Take on the Market, The Future | 4 comments

Encinitas Pre-Approved ADUs


The cities of Carlsbad and San Diego should do this too:

Encinitas is offering homeowners a money-saving solution for building granny flats on their properties, hoping that these units will help meet the city’s housing goals.

The City of Encinitas created the Permit-Ready ADU (PRADU) program that will offer property owners pre-approved building plans for granny flats.

The city said this will reduce pre-construction costs, create expedited building permits and waive all city development fees.

This comes after the San Diego Board of Supervisors voted to waive permit and development fees for granny flats countywide earlier this month.

Encinitas is working with two local architects to offer homeowners a variety of pre-approved building plans.

PRADU is estimated to save homeowners up to $18,000.  The city said it will have the pre-approved plans available at the Development Services Department’s front counter.

Read full article here:

https://www.nbcsandiego.com/news/local/Encinitas-to-Offer-Homeowners-a-504658272.html

Posted by on Jan 22, 2019 in ADU, Encinitas, Jim's Take on the Market | 4 comments

County Waives Fees for ADUs

We’ve talked about one-story homes – another way to add insulation from any potential downturn is to buy a property that can accommodate a granny flat. They can produce extra cash flow (the county states that they can be rented), and if you ever have to sell, there are home buyers looking to have grandma on-site rather than putting her in a senior facility at $5,000 per month.  Cities have been slow to accommodate the accessory dwelling units (ADUs), but they need to comply with low-income housing so they should come around.

Hat tip to Bryce and Nancy:

The San Diego Board of Supervisors voted to waive fees for residents building accessory units on their property Wednesday to address the county housing shortage.

These accessory dwelling units, known as “granny flats,” are described as attached or detached residential spaces to an existing property that can provide sleeping, eating, cooking, and sanitation, according to the county.

“This is a critical step in our on-going efforts to address the region’s housing crisis, especially the serious need for affordable housing,” said District 2 Supervisor Dianne Jacob. “This new program is the quickest and easiest way for us to expedite the development of housing.”

The board voted Wednesday to waive all county permit and development impact fees over the next five years with the hopes of bringing thousands of additional granny-flat homes across the county.

The previous cost of a permit for a granny flat was $1,222 plus $0.0411 per square-foot of space, according to the county’s website.

In total, residents planning to build granny flats could save an average of $14,000, according to District 5 Supervisor Jim Desmond.

In order to offset the loss of these fees, the county said it would subsidize $11 million for the five-year program.

“We will continue to be creative and challenge the status quo to solve the region’s housing crisis,” said Desmond.

The incentivized units can be used for family members or rented out as a source of income for the homeowner, the Board of Supervisors said.

To learn more about what constitutes a granny flat, go to the county’s website.

Link to Article

Posted by on Jan 10, 2019 in ADU, Jim's Take on the Market, The Future | 3 comments

Instant ADU

If baby boomers have to sell their home because they need the money, this will be a great alternative – and could help to dry up the housing inventory, especially if you can build an ADU for less than $50,000.  Homes with bigger yards would be more valuable too.

Link to Article

Today, Samara is announcing a new initiative called Backyard, “an endeavor to design and prototype new ways of building and sharing homes,” according to a press statement, with the first wave of test units going public in 2019.

It means Airbnb is planning to distribute prototype buildings next year.

The name “Backyard” might imply that Airbnb just wants to build Accessory Dwelling Units (ADUs), those small cottages that sit behind large suburban houses and are often rented on Airbnb. Gebbia clarifies that is not the case. “The project was born in a studio near Airbnb headquarters,” he says in an interview over email. “We always felt as if we were in Airbnb’s backyard–physically and conceptually–and started referring to the project as such.”

Backyard is poised to be much larger than ADUs, in Gebbia’s telling. Yes, small prefabricated dwellings could be in the roadmap, but so are green building materials, standalone houses, and multi-unit complexes. Think of Backyard as both a producer and a marketplace for selling major aspects of the home, in any shape it might come in.

Read More

Posted by on Dec 1, 2018 in ADU, Boomer Liquidations, Boomers, Homeless Cure, Jim's Take on the Market, Modular Homes, Real Estate Investing, Remodel Projects | 1 comment